DIY Tote Tank

JDPoole12JDPoole12 Member Posts: 4
Hey Everybody, so after watching hundreds of videos and scouring through hundreds of posts I have decided to take the plunge and give hydro-dipping a shot. I'm in the process of building my first tank and wanted to show my current progress. Over the course of the next few weeks I'll be running the plumbing, waterproofing everything, building a cover for the top and adding some trim to give the exterior the finished off look. I'll give another update once that comes together.




Comments

  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Member, Moderator, Business Ninja Posts: 7,856 El Moderator
    Better than some of the DIY tanks I have seen. Can you explain what the second tote is for? This is a design that I have not seen before and some of the components are confusing me
  • JDPoole12JDPoole12 Member Posts: 4

    Better than some of the DIY tanks I have seen. Can you explain what the second tote is for? This is a design that I have not seen before and some of the components are confusing me

    Thanks! Yeah so this design came from one i had seen online. I'm planning on using the second tank for the scavenge side/rinsing. it will obviously have a lower water level than the main dip tank.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Member, Moderator, Business Ninja Posts: 7,856 El Moderator
    That is what I assumed. You are going to want to make the dam opening as large as possible. Any turbulence to the surface of the water will cause film to dive into the tank rather than go to the filter. I am interested in what you are going to use for a heating source as well.
  • JDPoole12JDPoole12 Member Posts: 4
    Thank you for the feedback I will rework the opening to make sure it's wider. I had initially planned on using 2 500W tank heaters to heat the water. From what I can tell each one will heat up to 130 gallons.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Member, Moderator, Business Ninja Posts: 7,856 El Moderator
    I am not sure that is right. Most people use 2- 2500W elements. We had a tank that held about 400 gallons, and it took about 1/2 hour to heat up 50°. And our tank was insulated VERY well.

    Here is some info I found
    A typical 50-gallon electric tank runs at 4500 watts.
    At 3.412 BTUs per watt, 4500 watts = 15,354 BTU.
    At 92% efficiency, that's 14,126 BTU.
    From above, heating a gallon of water by 1°F takes 8.33 BTU.
    Heating from 68°F to 104°F would by a 36°F rise, or 36 x 8.33 = 300 BTU to heat 1 gallon of water.
    With 14,126 BTU, we could heat 14,126 BTU ÷ 300 BTU/gallon = 47 gallons.
    So, our typical 4500-watt electric heater can make 47 gallons of hot water per hour

    I think those totes are around 300 gallons each, and you are going to need about 100 gallons in the scavenge side to cover the elements. so about 400 total.

    I can't do the math for you right now, but that is A LOT of BTU's needed. I would put that tank on a very sturdy stand, and cut the height in half, and put something on the scavenge side that holds your elements and nothing more than needed.
  • JDPoole12JDPoole12 Member Posts: 4
    That feedback is why i joined this forum and didn't just keep stalking the posts. thanks again for your feedback, def have plenty more research to do it seems.
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