Stretching and uncertainty!

nathana94nathana94 Member Posts: 21
Hey guys! 

Would like to start by thanking everyone for all the incredible information on here! I started getting into hydrodipping about a week ago and I’m having insane amounts of fun, made so much better by all the advise and tips already on here that helped me learn!

I did a dip today which has stretched a fair amount on the back - I’ve read what I can find here and online so apologies if I’ve missed a thread, but what causes such extreme stretching? I dipped in at a 45 angle to catch some little bits on the front, and then slowly rotated and pushed down slowly into the water - should I be pushing forward too to prevent the stretch?

I’m hoping (certain) someone on here will be able to help me - I’m trying to use old stuff I have instead of ordering speed shapes online with everyone as busy as they are right now, and while I’m somewhat happy with the result, I’m unsure if it’s the best it could be - I was hoping someone could let me know if I’m under activating or over activating at all, mostly just for reassurance that I’m on the right track! 

Sorry for the long first post! Thanks guys!

Comments

  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Member, Moderator Posts: 3,540 El Moderator
    That's about as good as it's going to get unless you double dip it.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Member, Moderator, Business Ninja Posts: 7,593 El Moderator
    Stretching is inevitable. I honestly don't see anything out of the ordinary. As you get better at your techniques, you will figure out different ways to get the stretch where it's not as visible, but it will always be somewhere.

    No signs of under or overactivation, but here is a thread that should help you identify them when they do show up.

    https://k2forums.com/discussion/10060/troubleshooting-your-first-few-dips#latest

    Have fun with the process, but understand that this is a VERY expensive hobby to get consistent results. The techniques take a while to learn, and the equipment is not cheap. Aerosol kits will get you started, but won't last long.
  • nathana94nathana94 Member Posts: 21
    @WileECoyote @NotSoFast thank you both! Good to know I’m on the right track. One thing I noticed when pushing the part down in the water, is that the film sort of pulled itself toward the piece instead of staying on top of the water for me to push forward as I push down - is that normal behaviour for a film regardless of activation? 

    For the time being I’m just using aerosols, you’re right, they really don’t last as long as I thought they might.. but I’m putting that down to my bad application technique at the start!
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Member, Moderator, Business Ninja Posts: 7,593 El Moderator
    edited May 20
    nathana94 said:

    @WileECoyote @NotSoFast thank you both! Good to know I’m on the right track. One thing I noticed when pushing the part down in the water, is that the film sort of pulled itself toward the piece instead of staying on top of the water for me to push forward as I push down - is that normal behaviour for a film regardless of activation?

    One of the reasons this is such a hard process to teach, is because most of the answers to questions is "that depends"
  • nathana94nathana94 Member Posts: 21
    @WileECoyote @NotSoFast thank you both! Good to know I’m on the right track. One thing I noticed when pushing the part down in the water, is that the film sort of pulled itself toward the piece instead of staying on top of the water for me to push forward as I push down - is that normal behaviour for a film regardless of activation?
    One of the reasons this is such a hard process to teach, is because most of the answers to questions is "that depends"  

    I suppose it wouldn’t be such a craft if it was all so black and white!

    im going to give the back piece another shot after a re-prep. I’ve seen some images of results with little to no stretching so I guess it’s just a case of practice! 

    Just before I go to set up again though, if you were dipping this kind of shape, would you keep a consistent angle, or would you likely rotate as you reached the curves?
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Member, Moderator, Business Ninja Posts: 7,593 El Moderator
    The most experienced dippers I see always try to compensate for curves where it is practical. Unless the part is huge, or is too complex there is always changes in angle.
  • nathana94nathana94 Member Posts: 21
    Had another crack and learned a very quick lesson about how important it is to watch your film and pull creases out before the film gets comfy and sticks.. every days a school day!
  • studebakerstudebaker Member, Business Ninja Posts: 3,743 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Ok, now you're just having fun.... :-)
  • nathana94nathana94 Member Posts: 21
    @studebaker until the next issue pops up and I have another mini breakdown in the corner.. but then hopefully the fun part returns!
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