House of Kolor paint

ShannonShannon Posts: 221Member ✭✭✭
Hi everyone, just wondering if anyone in this forum has used or is yawing House of Kolor paint? In particular the primer which apparently you can dip direct too? 

We now have a rep here in Australia that’s I’ve been in touch with and he says that they can tint the primer to the colour I need and I can dip to it direct. Sounds good and just thought I’d see if anyone else has been doing this or if someone has tried but it didn’t work.

thanks

Comments

  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,192Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    You can dip direct to almost any paint... as long as you are in it's recoatability window. What is the window on this paint? Paints made for this process can be anywhere from a few days to a year.
  • ShannonShannon Posts: 221Member ✭✭✭
    You can dip direct to almost any paint... as long as you are in it's recoatability window. What is the window on this paint? Paints made for this process can be anywhere from a few days to a year.
    I’m unsure at the moment as I have looked at the TDS for it. It not a common paint in Australia that I’m aware of and was hoping you guys in the Us might’ve had some experience with it.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,192Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    In the US, House Of Kolor makes all sorts of special paints, typically for the Hot Rod Industry. Metallics, pearls, stenciling and specialty paints like that. Been around forever, but I don't know the recoatability window. Almost all hot rod owners have their high end cars painted with this type of paint. Don't know what the "Yawing" designates. That may be something else entirely.
  • ShannonShannon Posts: 221Member ✭✭✭
    @Trouble thank you and nice work. It’s good to see and know HOK is good to use. I had a lot of issues and wasted a lot of money here in Aus trying to get a paint that works well with this process. I do use DNA Custom paints but the shop that sellable it has just shut down so I’m looking at other options. I can get DNA shipped to me but everything here is so expensive so if I can cut out some expenses it works out better.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,192Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @Shannon any paint that isn't specifically used for this process (and isn't a "box store" aerosol) is going to work essentially the same way. If you are having problems with a "dip window" on on paint, you are going to have the same problem with another
  • ShannonShannon Posts: 221Member ✭✭✭
    @WileECoyote I found that the paints I tried when starting off would melt(soften and sag) from the activator after dipping. No idea why, I do the exact same process with the DNA paint without a problem. Maybe just gremlins 😂
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 10,131Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @Shannon some paints just aren't compatible. If you told the paint manufacturer that you were going to dip their paint into a film coated in a mixture of paint reducer and Xylene, and if that was ok? None of them would say Yes... unless it's designed for this process. Typical paint suppliers know very little about our process. This is the main reason why we recommend a known, compatible paint (... one designed for this process ...) for anyone just starting out. Eliminate that variable while learning, then you can experiment later.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,192Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @Shannon Sounds like you might have been using a single component paint. Have you priced out any of the water based paints that are designed for this process? Aqualac or Hydrosolutions are very easy to use, and they don't carry the restrictions that solvent based do for shipping into your country. It isn't what I would call cheap... but it will immediately fix all of your problems.
  • ShannonShannon Posts: 221Member ✭✭✭
    @MidOhioHydrographics I totally agree with you know, especially after learning the hard way. DNA Custom Paints make activator, which is one of the reasons I switched to their product once I found that out and since haven’t had any problems with paint. Unless I caused them which is ok because it means I know what to fix within my system.
  • ShannonShannon Posts: 221Member ✭✭✭
    @WileECoyote I’m unsure What the problem was, I did start to look down the path of trying to get OHW imported until I found the local made paints that I’m using now. Hopefully as Hydrographics grows in Australia it will give opportunity for more suppliers.
  • TroubleTrouble Posts: 454Member ✭✭✭
    @Shannon Many people starting out are quick to blame the Paint or film. Most of the time it is their process. Also I know you guys were having trouble finding activator in Australia. Are you using a home brew or a proven manufactured activator with a good track record. A home brew may be too strong and attacking your base. A good water base paint like @WileECoyote suggested may be the way to go. If you are just testing and trying to learn you may try a good water base house paint Not I would not use this type of paint other than practice. I have heard a few guys practicing with that. Also post pictures of your failures and someone here can help you diagnose the problem.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,192Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @Shannon OHW is not water based. You can test with house paint like @Trouble mentioned. Behr seems to make a decent paint for this process, BUT ONLY FOR TESTING. You should not sell product painted with house paint.
  • ShannonShannon Posts: 221Member ✭✭✭
    @Trouble originally when I started out a couple of years ago I tried making the activator myself with pretty poor results. I then found a company here that does make activator and I started using their activator and paint without and problems at all. Since I’ve been using their paint and activator I’m  that 99% of the issues now are created from me.
  • ShannonShannon Posts: 221Member ✭✭✭
    @WileECoyote thanks for that, I always thought OHW was water based for some reason. I have tried water based auto paint here in the past and found the activated melted it, even 24 hours after I painted
  • TroubleTrouble Posts: 454Member ✭✭✭
    @Shannon I have heard that the waterborne automotive paints are not compatible with the process
    however I have not tried myself.
  • ShannonShannon Posts: 221Member ✭✭✭
    @Trouble afternoon trialling then I would have to say they aren’t🤣. My personal experience with them was that when rinsing after the dip the paint had softened and would start to sag and create a big message if not just rinse off. I found this to happen even after waiting 24 hours between base coating and dipping.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,192Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @shannon those are totally different paints. Paints like Hydrosolutions and Aqualac actually hold up better than some of the solvent based paints. Testing that students did at trainings showed you could absorb 6-7 passes of activator (1 pass was enough to get the film to bond correctly) with paints like this. Let me assure you again, using a waterbased paint MADE FOR THIS PROCESS will COMPLETELY eliminate your problems.
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