Question from a beginner

hi everyone. New to the forum and I would be very grateful for any advice. I noticed in forum discussion that a lot of you use a media blaster. I was trained at TWN last year and not once did they show us how to use or even that a media blast was recommended. Our training was basically scuffing, painting basecoat , dipping, and clear coat.  What do you guys recommend get blasted?  Or even primed for that matter. 
Thanks in advance. 

Comments

  • TroubleTrouble Posts: 422Member ✭✭✭
    I have one from Redline stands I use it mostly on metal. Its great to have but I do most of my prep by hand or orbital sander.
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 2,153Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭

    You can get away with doing something like a tumbler by hand (scuffing).

    But I'll tell you, the FIRST time you have to sand down that cup because you messed up..yea.. you want a blaster.

    or, if you do something with lot's of edges.. like a hard hat.. or a 4-wheeler part.. or a gun parts...or.. or.. or..

    Basically, most things have to have an initial mechanical bonding (scratches for the paint to bind into to)...Not everything, but most things... if something is SMOOTH.. sure, hand scuff it.

    But for stuff that has edges and corners....


    (pic of the wife using our blaster...)





  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 10,032Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Our blaster is invaluable. We use it daily. A lot. So much so that we got rid of our original "Grizzly Industrial" and spent a significant amount on an Empire pressure blast cabinet that saves us a ton of time. We are blasting a lot of parts for production accounts. Sometimes we scuff, sometimes we just AP/Paint, but sometimes blasting is the best option. All depends.
  • TonguesTonyTonguesTony Posts: 4Member
    edited February 21
    Thanks for the tip! Will take note of these as well.

    By the way, new guy here as well. I'm usually found at home, feeding my Pomeranian with some treats and watching TV with my wife. And when we're not indoors, we would play catch in our backyard with our dog (though we had to secure one of those petsafe Stay+Play wireless dog fence, just so he wouldn’t stray far from our yard. Our neighbor had a weak wooden partition, and we once had an argument when the poor fella ended up on his lawn). Such a simple, yet, happy life. Cheers!
    Post edited by TonguesTony on
  • kdr3003kdr3003 Posts: 3Member
    Guys. Can’t thankyou enough for sharing. Very helpful. 
  • kdr3003kdr3003 Posts: 3Member
    smedlin said:
    You can get away with doing something like a tumbler by hand (scuffing). But I'll tell you, the FIRST time you have to sand down that cup because you messed up..yea.. you want a blaster. or, if you do something with lot's of edges.. like a hard hat.. or a 4-wheeler part.. or a gun parts...or.. or.. or.. Basically, most things have to have an initial mechanical bonding (scratches for the paint to bind into to)...Not everything, but most things... if something is SMOOTH.. sure, hand scuff it. But for stuff that has edges and corners.... (pic of the wife using our blaster...)
    What would you do as far as a auto rim?  In perfect condition. Blast all the way down to the metal or sand and scuff?  
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,042Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    I wouldn't blast a rim. Lots of liability with that. If you want to scuff and sand though, that is alot safer... But not touching them at all is even better
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 2,153Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭

    I wouldn't blast a rim. Lots of liability with that. If you want to scuff and sand though, that is alot safer... But not touching them at all is even better

    Why would blasting them be a liability?

    I've never done rims.. not sure i want to do rims.. but I keep getting asked about doing them.
  • SreynoldsSreynolds Posts: 1,485Member ✭✭✭✭
    @smedlin , I guess just like helmets or hard hats .... Anything goes wrong, your fault or not... it can turn on you quick if you have defaced them in any way.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,042Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    The media causes microfractures. All the corners in a rim are rounded for that reason (so too not cause a stress point where a crack could form). Blasting defeats that purpose. I have done it in the past, I wont ever do it again. You may get lucky, but fair warning.
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 2,153Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 13,958Administrator El Jefe
    Your results may vary...but yea...be careful...
  • TonguesTonyTonguesTony Posts: 4Member
    "Your results may vary...but yea...be careful..."

    Thanks! Will keep that in mind.
  • SingleAction52SingleAction52 Posts: 730Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭
    @WyleECoyote, that's not why rims are round. B) B)

    The media causes microfractures. All the corners in a rim are rounded for that reason (so too not cause a stress point where a crack could form). Blasting defeats that purpose. I have done it in the past, I wont ever do it again. You may get lucky, but fair warning.









  • BmorekreativeBmorekreative Posts: 3Member
    Media blasting wheels is perfectly fine. We personally powder coat hundreds of set per year including forged wheels. Every one of them gets media blasted.
  • ForsiForsi Posts: 327Member ✭✭✭
    We use our media blaster daily and it is invaluable for the hydrodip and Cerakote work we do. Just learn what psi and media is right for the various substrates you are working with. With regards to wheels you can media blast them, just do a light blast so you are just "etching" them enough for the paint to bite and use a fine garnet media. If you use too coarse of a media and at too high of pressure you do risk changing the shape of the wheels/edges, etc.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,042Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @Bmorekreative can you elaborate on this a little more. Specifically where the manufacturers of the wheels is still taking liability after you modify the wheel? Does this include whatever media someone comes across that could possibly use in their home setups? When the lawyers come sniffing around are you going to step in and assure them that "Media blasting wheels is perfectly fine"?

    Maybe you can give us some of your qualifications, considering this is your first post?

    We try to get good useful information on this forum, while setting good guidelines to follow for the current topics, and for people that may be searching this subject in the future.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 10,032Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    I see where @Bmorekreative is coming from. I could make a similar statement that *for my business* modifying firearms through my company’s processes is perfectly fine. But I carry a HEFTY liability policy for anything that may go wrong and the lawyers come knocking.
  • BmorekreativeBmorekreative Posts: 3Member
    @WileECoyote yea of course let me educate.

    I would personally recommend blasting with garnet no higher than 80 psi. You can also use AO (Aluminum Oxide), Sand, Coal Slag and Starblast Medias. Media size I would choose a 80 mesh or finer since you are only trying to put a light grade on the surface. I would not recommend any steel shot media especially for aluminum products.

    Qualifications wise I personally have over 20,000 hours of experience in the powder coating industry.

    Also I feel that whether you are media blasting products or not there are liabilities everywhere and that's the risk anyone as a business owner takes. If you're scared of that then you should probably not be in business to begin with. Just be careful and if you are skeptical at first try it on something of your own.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,042Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator

    since you are only trying to put a light grade on the surface. I would not recommend any steel shot media especially for aluminum products.

    This is the most important part. Most guys get the idea to have their rims dipped once the factory finish starts corroding off. The problem is that to get these to look good, you have to blast all the way down to base material over the entire rim. Taking that much powdercoat off requires a lot of work... unless you start using steel shot, or something really aggressive. I know there are ways to do this that are safe, but without listing every possible variable (and I don't have the expertise that comes with 20,000 hours of work in this industry) it's easier to say "stay away". We appreciate your input to the forum, that's what makes this a great resource, so please continue to do so.
  • BmorekreativeBmorekreative Posts: 3Member
    @WileECoyote I see where you are coming from in that aspect depending on the current condition of the wheels it is easier to "stay away" in a general aspect of not knowing what each individual is dealing with to be on the safe side. Absolutely, I have been lurking on the forum for bit now and have learned A LOT from the knowledge that is on here!
Sign In or Register to comment.