Hello!

timallen123timallen123 Posts: 2Member
edited January 10 in New Members Welcome!
Hi everyone,

I have been a silent follower on here for a couple of months now and was a bit apprehensive about posting. I run a small hydrographic set up in Oxford and have been going since November 2017. However, I was a bit nervous because I don't have all the professional kit everyone talks of on here. I started using a dip kit at home.

Anyway, I am getting to the stage now where I am considering scaling the business up when I graduate in June to sustain a full time wage and wanted to get peoples advice. I have a few options, I can potentially build an outbuilding in my garden at home and install a small spray booth/room and potentially a tank or I could lease a warehouse space somewhere local. This would obviously be a lot more expensive and reduce my margins but would leave room for future growth and more space for equipment.

So, what should I do? I have minimal savings so would need to raise investment externally as well as using the profits made in the first year to build these facilities. My main reservations are that I don't really need a full size tank as the film is only about 25cm2 and therefore a large tank seems a bit overkill. However I am very keen learn from the experts!

Finally, I also use rattle can lacquers which are ok but I started testing a gloss Vallejo airbrush varnish which gives a good finish but is not overly glossy. Are there any other lacquers I could thin down and spray through a 0.4mm airbrush to lacquer the glasses with a high gloss finish?

Hopefully that all makes sense and sorry for the long introduction!

Tim
Post edited by timallen123 on

Comments

  • SreynoldsSreynolds Posts: 1,485Member ✭✭✭✭
    If dipping a few pairs of glasses is where you are now, I wouldn't jump into a lease ! If you have the space at home to build a decent size shop... that's the direction I would go. To make a profitable business out of this you will need the proper equipment to do so. A plastic tote, air brush, and a few rattle cans of paint wont get it done. Aquagraphix would be the company I would go to in the UK, they seem to be good folks.

    This is not a easy business to get off the ground, its expensive and frustrating as hell. I see a lot more getting out than in these days! Not bashing or down grading here ... just good honest talk ! welcome to the forum and good luck to you !!
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Posts: 1,868Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Welcome
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,956Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    You have two choices and I know someone here looks at it the opposite way I do, so I will try to give both sides.

    Side one. Jump in to this with both feet, get the equipment and building you need and get out there and hustle up some business to make your life. It will be tough to start with, but eventually it pays off, or your business folds and you move on.

    Side two. You have an education, and currently you are adding some income by doing this on the side. Get a job that pays the bills and chase your dream on the side, slowly adding to your process as needed. If it is a profitable business, it will take off, and you can make the decision at that point.

    Considering over 80% of small businesses fail, I would ALWAYS defer to side 2
  • studebakerstudebaker Posts: 3,282Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    The low gloss finish is because you are putting it on with an airbrush! It's almost literally drying from the nozzle to the substrate. An airbrush is for color, not clear. Clear paint needs to "flow" to achieve a gloss. If you won't/refuse to use a full size professional spray gun, at least buy a cheap touch up gun.
  • timallen123timallen123 Posts: 2Member
    Thanks for the feedback.

    The low gloss finish is because you are putting it on with an airbrush! It's almost literally drying from the nozzle to the substrate. An airbrush is for color, not clear. Clear paint needs to "flow" to achieve a gloss. If you won't/refuse to use a full size professional spray gun, at least buy a cheap touch up gun.


    I am not against using a professional spray gun, I just thought it may be a tad overkill to paint such a small surface area like glasses. I will look into a professional spray gun.


  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,956Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Look at the Mini guns. @K2Concepts has them on his site
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 13,861Administrator El Jefe
    And welcome to the forum...
  • NickelCityHydroNickelCityHydro Posts: 710Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭
    Welcome aboard ! Some good advise given here.
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