Rim/wheel dip advice prep prior to dipping

JenxJenx Posts: 19Member, Business Ninja
Im after advice with dipping some rims. They are a factory silver finish that I would like to use as the base for a semi transparent film. There is no visible issues with the current coat the rims are relatively new. What is the best method to prep and dip
options im thinking are
-Scuff and clean with 800 and wax and grease remover then dip
-Scuff and clean then prime, basecoat and dip
-Scuff and clean then use an intercoat and dip

What is the best way and why based on the experience out there?

Comments

  • loochlooch Posts: 1,866Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Clean first then scuff  then clean again use intercoat clear if you are trying to use original color then dip
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 13,861Administrator El Jefe
    looch said:

    Clean first then scuff  then clean again use intercoat clear if you are trying to use original color then dip

    This...
  • JenxJenx Posts: 19Member, Business Ninja
    thanks
  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,392Member, Moderator El Moderator
    looch said:

    Clean first then scuff  then clean again use intercoat clear if you are trying to use original color then dip

    Correct. You can't dip to already cured factory paint. And on wheels, they are probably powder coated, so be advised.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,956Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Why do you clean after you scuff? You are contaminating the substrate. Always clean first so you don't grind anything in to the material, and then don't touch it with anything unless its iso and water before painting. Be careful to not break through the clear as it will discolor the base if it is a metallic.
  • JenxJenx Posts: 19Member, Business Ninja
    Why do you clean after you scuff? You are contaminating the substrate. Always clean first so you don't grind anything in to the material, and then don't touch it with anything unless its iso and water before painting. Be careful to not break through the clear as it will discolor the base if it is a metallic.
    I alwags clean first then scuff I just wrote the process the wrong way around (my bad there) but was intending the clean process prior to priming and painting etc in the post. 
    Thanks for the tip about breaking through the clear that a good point 
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,952Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator

    Why do you clean after you scuff? You are contaminating the substrate. Always clean first so you don't grind anything in to the material, and then don't touch it with anything unless its iso and water before painting. Be careful to not break through the clear as it will discolor the base if it is a metallic.

    I think to remove the scuffing dust. We do use isopropyl for this, but there are some antistatic pre-paint wipes that would probably work as well from Devilbiss I think. But I wouldn't use a degreaser or anything heavy at this stage.
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 2,108Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭



    I think to remove the scuffing dust. We do use isopropyl for this, but there are some antistatic pre-paint wipes that would probably work as well from Devilbiss I think. But I wouldn't use a degreaser or anything heavy at this stage.

    I have a large flat item I cleared the other day. It's not even a "dipped" item. Painted black and a logo on it.

    I wasn't really happy with the way the clear coat flowed. "I" could see a slight ripple. So I decided to wet sand it, make sure everything was mirror smooth, and reshoot the clear.

    After I finished wet sanding. I washed it with blue dawn soap, just to get all the stuff off. I rinsed it really really well.

    Or so I thought.

    When I re-cleared it... looked like the surface of the moon.

    I spent yesterday afternoon sanding it back down....
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,956Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Yep... NEVER anything other than iso and water
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