Average wage for experienced dipper

DirtyDogDippinDirtyDogDippin Posts: 15Member
edited May 2018 in K2 Business Forums
What is the pay scale for experienced dippers. Need it for my business plan. Thank you

Comments

  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 2,240Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
  • DirtyDogDippinDirtyDogDippin Posts: 15Member
    I thought this was a site for help. Not to be fun of but thanks for your input
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Posts: 1,911Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited May 2018
    Are u asking what would someone pay a experience dipper as a hire?
  • DirtyDogDippinDirtyDogDippin Posts: 15Member
    edited May 2018
    My hubby and I will be doing it on a custom scale. We bought our building outright. The city/federal gov we are in is helping to restore/rebuild the 8000sq ft building through grant monies.we have already been approved. So I am trying to cover all my bases and be as informed as possible while writing our business plan. 
    So I really appreciate any input and it could increase our grant monies and allow us to hire an experienced fellow Dipper that may be in need of a job.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,225Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    You are going to have to get much more specific.

    For dipping alone? I would hire between $12-$15 per hour... honestly this is probably the easiest part of the job.

    For someone who also paints? you could add $2-$3, if they can paint without runs and solvent pop and put on a clearcoat that only requires minimal buffing? Add $5 to the base price.

    If they are ordering all their own supplies, and training others others? Add another $5

    Can the person Buff?
    Can they troubleshoot the process?
    Can they actually FIX the process if there is something wrong?
    Can they fix equipment?
    Alot of variables in this... Experienced dipper doesn't mean much.

    Of course this is what I would hire someone at the company I worked for here in Wisconsin. You can add benefits in on top of that. And adjust for your area of the country, and your local wage scale, how willing the person is to be trained, and many other factors.

    And this site is for help... but making fun of each other is how we prevent yelling at someone for asking the same question as 138 other people this month because they couldn't be troubled to use the search bar. I myself use sarcasm like salt on food, gonna need to take the good with the bad just a little bit...
  • DirtyDogDippinDirtyDogDippin Posts: 15Member
    edited May 2018
    Thank you @WileECoyote. The numbers help more then you know. 
    I really do try not to ask a question and read all communications. I did not find a thread on it.  
    I will thickin my skin as a newbie. Sorry for sounding bitchy @smedlin. I'm sure your knowledge will be used and needed as I have read alot of your comments in threads.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,225Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @DirtyDogDippin I didn't mean YOUR question had been asked before... as a matter of fact, it might be the ONLY time I have heard it. We just got to amuse ourselves once in a while.
  • DirtyDogDippinDirtyDogDippin Posts: 15Member
    @WileECoyote it seems to be in line with my commercial painting pay scales. So that will help me be more realistic and responsible when writing the employee part of our plan. Thanks again
  • DirtyDogDippinDirtyDogDippin Posts: 15Member
    @WileECoyote I see that you separated the pay scale. Do you generally hire position specific?  Don't most do it all?
  • LibertymanLibertyman Posts: 967Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭
    @DirtyDogDippin .. there are quite a few guys and gals on this site that are very knowledgeable on many questions you may have. please use the search bar for other questions you may have down the road. The sometimes sick humor is all in fun and you may at some point even find yourself diving into the banter along the way. The experience of many, on this site is unbelievable and their knowledge and expertise is second to none, Jim @K2Concepts, Trevor @WileECoyote , Joe @MidOhioHydrographics to name a few, are the leaders of this great forum, If one of those 3 can't answer your questions. we are all in trouble. @WileECoyote never stops amazing me on, his knowledge of painting, booth set up, buffing, painting, clearing, jig building/design and team leading of businesses of all sizes. @MidOhioHydrographics Joe, runs a full blown production shop with a bunch of good guys working under him, he seems to know more about the intricacies of set up, where to find the oddest items to make your shop work better, for dipping, automation, or equipment needs. You couldn't ask to meet a nicer guy. then there is the big Kahuna @K2Concepts he likes to poke fun an everyone on occasion, but man does he know his Sh$$, I am not sure if there is an item out there, that he hasn't dipped, prepped.or helped someone figure out a better way to get the job done the right way. Many others on the forum, have been here quite awhile as well and have their own experiences to share or help you with along the way. The sarcasm, and jabs will always be here, take them with a ha, ha, and a grain of salt. But reap the benefits that it has to offer and please share your input, successes and failures along the way. Its all about getting better at what you do and helping our industry grow and help others along the way.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 10,167Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @Libertyman thank you for the kind words. Anyone that does something 50+ hours a week will get good/knowledgeable about it...It's probably more like 70 hours a week counting the time at home I spend answering emails and researching... Oh the life of a business owner, I suppose! LOL.

    @DirtyDogDippin my situation will be slightly different because I'm in a production shop. I base my wages off local assembly line workers. Anybody can be trained to do anything. My shop manager (premium pay) or myself set up all the paint guns, and then my production guys run the parts. They may make tweaks to the gun depending on how they spray or changes in environment, but overall? They just run parts. I've set it up so I can easily have someone dipping within a day and turning out perfect parts. This is by design to keep my overhead low.

    Our process normally consists of fixtured runs of many small parts. We place parts on the fixtures (I design and prototype) Degrease, paint, load onto a dip arm to dip (press a button to activate and dip), load them into the conveyor rinser, blow dry, touch up w/ airbrush, apply clear topcoat.

    Pay starts at $10/hour, caps at $12.50/hour for base production workers (I have three). This is very competitive to local production line workers. I have one of those guys that also specializes in custom work and he gets a cash bonus on all that work. I have a shop supervisor (third in charge, better pay) and a shop manager (second in charge and responsible for the shop and everything that happens when I'm away, premium pay).

    The shop manager is tasked with keeping supplies in stock, ordering coatings, helping test/build fixturing/tooling for new parts, and some communication with the businesses we work with (we do work for multiple large outdoor OEMs). The shop supervisor is responsible for keeping workers on task, and also testing/building some fixtures and tooling, color sampling, etc.

    All this is in place so I don't really have to be there. I do 90% of the direct communication with the clients (they like to talk to the owner) and most of the more intricate engineering for tooling/fixture design. My manager is getting better, but he still needs help. I can spend my time at the other family business - a successful rather large firearms manufacturer. This takes up probably 60% of my time now. And I'm very thankful to have an integrated life with a laptop and cell phone that I can use to run my business and also keep informed of everything going on with the firearms manufacturer also.

    Since you're doing custom work primarily, price your labor similar to an autobody repair shop where they are required to have some skill set for repairing parts, different paint systems, etc. Check for job listings around your area and stay competitive.
  • DirtyDogDippinDirtyDogDippin Posts: 15Member
    Thank you so much to all @Libertyman , @WileECoyote , @smedlin , @MidOhioHydrographics
     I am lucky to have found this site in my search for information before we went forward. And yes I have figured out who the top dogs are in this business. I am ever so grateful they are willing to share their brains. I am hoping to model our business in the same manner as the community on here.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,225Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator

    @WileECoyote I see that you separated the pay scale. Do you generally hire position specific?  Don't most do it all?

    I would say the ones that can do all... are gonna be bored as hell just dipping all day. I wouldn't be putting all my eggs in one basket like that. Depending on the clients you have lined up, I would say you shouldn't be able to be down if your main guy is sick. I would rather pay 3 guys $12 an hour that know something about all of the processes, than one guy $20 an hour that shuts down my operation when he leaves for the day.
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 14,073Administrator El Jefe
    That's always the balancing act, isn't it? You get someone high enough on the food chain that it takes the burden off you? And then he quits and you are right back in the trenches...
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 10,167Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Also remember that most people don’t quit their job, they quit their boss. Be a good employer. I’m a small company that can’t afford insurance and other “benefits” so I try my best to make up for it in other ways. Buy them lunch once a week (a real sit down restaurant lunch, not just order them pizza in the shop), thank them w cash bonuses when things are going well, let them have a beer at 5:20 after a long hot day, let them off for opening day of deer season, pay them to attend K2 Ohio Remote Training for 3 days :lol: ... things large companies can’t do.
  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,468Member, Moderator El Moderator

    Also remember that most people don’t quit their job, they quit their boss. Be a good employer. I’m a small company that can’t afford insurance and other “benefits” so I try my best to make up for it in other ways. Buy them lunch once a week (a real sit down restaurant lunch, not just order them pizza in the shop), thank them w cash bonuses when things are going well, let them have a beer at 5:20 after a long hot day, let them off for opening day of deer season, pay them to attend K2 Ohio Remote Training for 3 days :lol: ... things large companies can’t do.

    If I was in Ohio, I'd be putting in my application. You have a sweet setup up there.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,225Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    And when @MidOhioHydrographics is ready to take the step to being a bigger company, I might put in my application too...
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 14,073Administrator El Jefe
    I would go but it's too close to Wisconsin...
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 7,225Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator

    I would go but it's too close to Wisconsin...

    **Badword**
  • DirtyDogDippinDirtyDogDippin Posts: 15Member
    Lol we are in Michigan. Close to WI.  I signed up with our local small business development center. Their services are free of charge. 😀  Starting bti feel real. Thanks everyone. Your input is priceless.
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