Question on Gun Stock Technique

smedlinsmedlin Member, Business Ninja Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited March 2018 in Hunting & Fishing Related
I'm not asking "how", that is covered here and other places. Plenty of Videos for examples.

I'm asking.. why? For you who dip full size gun stocks, what method do YOU prefer, and why?

I'm going to be out of town for a bit and when I come back, I'm going to dip my personal 30-06 (synthetic stock). Then I'm going to do my spiffy new A10.

I'm not going to use Camo, that's over done. I'll probably use a film that if there is drastic stretch, it would show.

So, there seems to be 3 methods.

Double Dip Method
  • Probably the easiest, but also the most time consuming.
  • Would leave 2 seams.
  • Zero stretch
I've already ruled this one out. I don't want that double seam.

Role Method
  • One seam
  • Seems like it would take practice and skill to get seam exactly down the bottom.
  • Very popular method, lots' of videos on it.

Single Insertion Method
  • No seam?
  • Possible Stretch?
  • Also popular. Lot's of videos

I'm intrigued by this method. If you watch the video below, the seam would be at the butt of the stock, which is usually covered (is on mine).

The guy went really really slow, and there didn't APPEAR to be any stretches in any of the guns they did. Course, they don't show any bad hits....just the good ones.




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So, what method do y'all prefer to use? Is there a reason you prefer it?

I'm asking to learn...

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Comments

  • norcalfranknorcalfrank Member Posts: 1,055 ✭✭✭
    Single insertion has a seam, and possibly lots of stretch. On the roll, I put the seam on top as it is the smallest seam. I like the looks of the roll the best muself,but have been doing some stocks 50.50 lately. Less problems all around, but takes longer.
  • PagesHydroDippingPagesHydroDipping Member Posts: 725 ✭✭✭
    Same here. I prefer the roll but it takes skill. I haven't really found the best way to go in. Always end up with some traped air. Normally it can be touched up but the least amount of touch up the best. I have been doin some 50/50 but it takes way to long. With a roll ots one and done no letting it dry, retapping, dip again. Being your personal gun i woild go with the roll cause if it dont work then you have time to fix. Youll be in no hurry. I just did my .270 and my scope and i went with a roll. Glad i did came out great
  • PagesHydroDippingPagesHydroDipping Member Posts: 725 ✭✭✭
    I've never tried just goin straight in. Seems like there woild be a ton of stretch and voids. Notice how on the video above he never really shows you the top.....
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Member Posts: 1,911 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I prefer the 50 50 method especially on AR type parts. Roll is nice with 1 seam but takes alot of practice to get the seam straight and in the right place. 
  • SeufertSeufert Member Posts: 63
    Watch the whole video on you tube of that guy dipping all of the same style stocks, he does some later on in the video In digital camo and the stretch really shows
  • smedlinsmedlin Member, Business Ninja Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Seufert said:

    Watch the whole video on you tube of that guy dipping all of the same style stocks, he does some later on in the video In digital camo and the stretch really shows

    i watched the video 3 or 4 times.. that one I saw. But the others looked ok.

    I may give it a whirl when I get back into town.. just to see how it works out.. .then (assuming it fails) try to roll it. If that fails, I'll freaking double dip it.
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Member Posts: 1,911 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @smedlin Jim did one at the remote if you was around when he did. Brent from Kansas Hydro did one also.  I have the video of Jim doing it somewhere
  • smedlinsmedlin Member, Business Ninja Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2018

    @smedlin Jim did one at the remote if you was around when he did. Brent from Kansas Hydro did one also.  I have the video of Jim doing it somewhere

    yea, if you have that, would love to see it.

    @K2Concepts has a video on YouTube where he demonstrates rolling a rifle stock.




    What worries "ME" is you can see where Jim hat a problem with the seam. At position 1:23 of the video. Not deep enough with the barrel end?

    I mean, if that happened with "JIM"???

    Btw, that is no slight intended to Jim. Just the opposite. I watch every video that man puts out (even the one's with my mom)....

    .
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Member, Moderator, Business Ninja Posts: 7,520 El Moderator
    I would suggest the roll. One seam isn't bad if you can pick a pattern that doesn't show it much. But if I really want it to look perfect? do a double dip and hide the seams with airbrushing, stripes or some sort of graphic...
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Administrator Posts: 14,155 El Jefe
    smedlin said:

    @smedlin Jim did one at the remote if you was around when he did. Brent from Kansas Hydro did one also.  I have the video of Jim doing it somewhere

    yea, if you have that, would love to see it.

    @K2Concepts has a video on YouTube where he demonstrates rolling a rifle stock.




    What worries "ME" is you can see where Jim hat a problem with the seam. At position 1:23 of the video. Not deep enough with the barrel end?

    I mean, if that happened with "JIM"???

    Btw, that is no slight intended to Jim. Just the opposite. I watch every video that man puts out (even the one's with my mom)....

    .
    Keep in mind that was the very FIRST TIME ANYONE had rolled a riffle stock...Hell I didn't even know I was going to roll it until I got to the point where I could not turn back...I wasn't sure what I was going to do...

    SO to answer your question? The seam ended up higher on the barrel end than normal but the guy loved it so I let it go...now that we have perfected our technique?...pretty fool proof...so blow...
  • smedlinsmedlin Member, Business Ninja Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭


    Keep in mind that was the very FIRST TIME ANYONE had rolled a riffle stock...Hell I didn't even know I was going to roll it until I got to the point where I could not turn back...I wasn't sure what I was going to do...

    SO to answer your question? The seam ended up higher on the barrel end than normal but the guy loved it so I let it go...now that we have perfected our technique?...pretty fool proof...so blow...


    Gotch ya.

    And, I'm actually glad you had that issue, else I never would have thought of that problem...until i did the same thing. Only my seam would probably wrap around the stock a few times...

    I'll definitely will practice it several times before I put film in the water.
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Member Posts: 1,911 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Here was the one from Ohio Remote. I just got the dip. Doesn't show right up on it when he is done 
  • ShannonShannon Member Posts: 221 ✭✭✭
    @smedlin I use both the roll and double dip method, just depends on the shape of stock as to which method I use.
  • smedlinsmedlin Member, Business Ninja Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Here was the one from Ohio Remote. I just got the dip. Doesn't show right up on it when he is done 


    O, that was single insert dip! And fast! He all but threw it in the water. Wish I knew how it turned out...

    Was impressive though.
  • smedlinsmedlin Member, Business Ninja Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Shannon said:

    @smedlin I use both the roll and double dip method, just depends on the shape of stock as to which method I use.



    It's just a "generic" rifle. Nothing fancy.
  • ShannonShannon Member Posts: 221 ✭✭✭
    @smedlin personally I’d roll that stock
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Member Posts: 1,911 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @smedlin it turned out great actually. It was one of the guys personal stock. I wish I could remember whose it was cause he could post some pics of it if he is still on the forum
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Administrator Posts: 14,155 El Jefe
    Turned out perfect...you have to go quick to stay ahead of the water and get a straight seam...equally important is how and where you back tape to control the water...
  • norcalfranknorcalfrank Member Posts: 1,055 ✭✭✭
    @smedlin you might have better luck getting the pattern to go in all that checkering if you 50/50 it. At least I have found it to work better for me. YMMV.
  • smedlinsmedlin Member, Business Ninja Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2018

    @smedlin you might have better luck getting the pattern to go in all that checkering if you 50/50 it. At least I have found it to work better for me. YMMV.

    I'll probably end up doing all three methods before I'm done :(

    I've been putting off learning how...and I really need to break into "that" scene.

    So many people "here" are asking when I'm going to start it.

    (Most of my friends/family are either ex-military, or have a CHG. And SO many of my friends are huge gun collectors... Let's just say, everybody is entitled to their views in life, but I don't hang around with anti-gun people. Shoot..I leave TODAY to fly to Ft Jackson to watch my youngest son graduate boot camp...)

    Even doing only the parts I can legally do, doing this part-time, I'd stay busy a year just doing my friends stuff.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Member, Moderator, Business Ninja Posts: 10,333 El Moderator
    edited March 2018
    smedlin said:


    I've been putting off learning how...and I really need to break into "that" scene.

    You won't regret it. I would honestly consider getting an FFL. It's pretty cheap, and we have a seemingly never ending supply of people wanting guns coated. Consider adding a service like Cerakote or Gunkote as well. You already have the booth and blaster, just need a small oven. We just opened up custom work again a couple months ago and I have a guy on it full time now. I don't even advertise. I bet I could bury my guy in work if I advertised even a bit. They all have their own quirks which can be frustrating, or fun, depending on if you like problem solving. Once you do a few different kinds of shotguns, rifles, etc. you'll get a feel for what needs done on each and breeze through it.
    Post edited by MidOhioHydrographics on
  • GunsnGuitarsGunsnGuitars Member Posts: 62 ✭✭
    I roll 99% of everything that I dip (guns). If it's a rifle stock with a trigger guard that is integral to the stock, then you start your roll with the top (or comb) of the stock facing you, bring it into the film until the seam is dead center and then start a slow roll. Roll all the way through until the entire trigger guard is in, then scoot the stock forward a bit while continuing to
    roll the rest of the way around. I use a handle attached to the center of the butt of the stock and another dowel handle attached to the barrel channel. control of the work piece is key. I can't control the roll very well without the handles. Double dip is too time consuming, and straight in stretches every time and the seam can be hit or miss. I go for the best possible single dip every time.
  • smedlinsmedlin Member, Business Ninja Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @GunsnGuitars, sounds like you have been doing a lot of rifles
  • smedlinsmedlin Member, Business Ninja Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Administrator Posts: 14,155 El Jefe
  • norcalfranknorcalfrank Member Posts: 1,055 ✭✭✭

    Turned out perfect...you have to go quick to stay ahead of the water and get a straight seam...equally important is how and where you back tape to control the water...

    So does the pattern of film matter much going straight in? I sure would like to do it that way, but I always figured that some films would show way too much stretch.
  • NWHNWH Member Posts: 94 ✭✭✭


    Top One was a single did bottom was a double dip.
  • ShannonShannon Member Posts: 221 ✭✭✭
    @preed they look awesome, you feed the film into the stock as your lowering it? I have tried this but get a bit twisted up without a second person to help.
  • preedpreed Member Posts: 403 ✭✭✭✭
    Not feeding straight in dip. 
    Not sure if it has anything to do with anything but I use 16" of film for a stock. In my experiance I have noticed the stock pull the film as its submerged. Any smaller and I noticed the taped edge holds the film instead of letting it move with it. When it holds it, it stretches. At 16 it has enough give not to get into a pulling situation, in other words it has no effect on the taped edge. Everybody is different I've just figured out what works for me. I have no doubt the speed of the dip also plays a factor as in too slow or too fast. My method and speed works for me. I've done tons of stocks, lots of practice.

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