How exactly do you polish to mirror finish?

Hello Guys

I have read a number of post in this forum on clear coat but I am still unsure of the best practice.

Hope I can learn as much from all the pros here.

My qs is how do you guys do the finishing of your item?

1) What should I do if I apply my first clear coat on the item, and after which i saw dust/ nibs on the surface?

Do i need to wait around 15mins before I can sand it off, or do I need to wait for the coat to be completely cured (12hours) before I can sand off the dirt and nibs?

2) Once I'm done with 2 or 3 coats of Final coat, it's time for me to polish it to get rid of dusts and nibs...

Is this the best Practice?
First step, wet sand with 1000 grid.
Second step, wet sand with 1500 grid.
Third step, wet sand with 2000 grid.
Fourth step, apply polishing compound and use an orbital tool.
Last step, apply final polishing.

Is this the right way?

Comments

  • CoastalHydrographicsCoastalHydrographics Posts: 3,047Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2016
    I mainly use OHW gloss clear on parts that will be outside taking a beating but I wait at least 12 hours then wet sand with soap n water using 800grt, 1000grt, 1500grt then 2000 but I've also used the same grt you posted as well just remember if you use those grts while cutting the 1000grt sanding marks has to turn into 1500 [by wet sanding] then the 1500 has to turn into 2000 [by sanding]then the cutting compound & pad you use really play's a huge roll. I just started using this meguiars [you can by at advance auto] which I really like with a orange 3m pad but you can jump on you tube just type in cutting & buffing clear coat and a lot of videos will pop up that may be helpful or use the search bar [top right of your screen] other guy's have posted their way of cutting & buffing clear.Good luck.!!
    buff.png 526.3K
  • isotretinoinisotretinoin Posts: 16Member
    @CoastalHydrographics Thanks for your input.

    I have never seen that before meguiars mirror glaze before. Right now, I have purchased

    1) 3M™ Perfect-It™ EX Rubbing Compound, PN 36060


    2) 3M™ Perfect-It™ Machine Polish, PN 06064



    I was wondering if anyone is using the items similar to what I am using.
    If you do, how do you use it?

    I intend to use item #1 with a Wool Pad, after I have wet sand 1000, 1500, 2000 grit on the surface.
    Then, I will finish it of with item #2 with a Finishing Black soft polishing pad.

    Is this a good start?
  • TsunamiTsunami Posts: 4,952Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    I am a 3M perfect-it only buyer. I have used it for 3 years. I use the appropriate white, grey, and blue double sided backer pads for each cycle. Fast cutting, faster polish. I will not waist my time and money on any other product. You dont need the third step unless you are going over black or a real dark finish. The wool might be too aggressive especially if your new. You will go through a few edges really fast. Stay with what they have designed for the system. The quick change adapter has been a great addition for the backer pads also. You can cut at 1200 2000 and then start using the #1. Just a little and your done. Change pads to #2 squirt a small amount on you project and you will be done in seconds.
  • AlanAlan Posts: 193Member ✭✭✭
    @isotretinoin - I had the following copied & pasted into a Word file. I can't remember the source with whom to give credit, however, I think it's useful information, nevertheless. Where it says use infra red to cure ... if you don't have that facility then maybe you just need to leave for 24hrs is my guess.

    "Before laying clear, it is a useful idea to lightly spray water on walls and floors to help keep down dust and debris getting into the clear.
    Use 260 micron filters
    Use a tack cloth to wipe down item
    Tack coat: spray about 6” away from the work piece, moving quickly using a full-fan pattern.
    Medium wet coat: spray a bit slower.
    Wet coat. slower pass
    Wet coat .
    Make sure you dry (infra red) the clear coat before sanding and buffing.

    If you get a nib in the first clear coat just give it another coat and then give a third coat and sand/polish it after. (1500 grit)
    Do at least 4 coats of clear"

  • onehitwonderonehitwonder Posts: 2,740Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
  • Archer0545Archer0545 Posts: 806Member ✭✭✭

    I mainly use OHW gloss clear on parts that will be outside taking a beating but I wait at least 12 hours then wet sand with soap n water using 800grt, 1000grt, 1500grt then 2000 but I've also used the same grt you posted as well just remember if you use those grts while cutting the 1000grt sanding marks has to turn into 1500 [by wet sanding] then the 1500 has to turn into 2000 [by sanding]then the cutting compound & pad you use really play's a huge roll. I just started using this meguiars [you can by at advance auto] which I really like with a orange 3m pad but you can jump on you tube just type in cutting & buffing clear coat and a lot of videos will pop up that may be helpful or use the search bar [top right of your screen] other guy's have posted their way of cutting & buffing clear.Good luck.!!

    Where is the best place to get that orbital tool and the pads for it?
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,404Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-3M-07653-Perfect-It-Denibbing-System-Kit-/191647995176?hash=item2c9f1c5528:g:9w8AAOSwrklVLHEl

    JUMP ON THIS DEAL

    This is cheaper than I paid over a year ago, and the exact same kit. Just price that nib sander and the oribital polisher alone, you'll see this is a deal
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,404Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    edited August 2016
    This is for nibs and smaller areas, not polishing the entire surface. But it works AMAZING.

    Here is what we do:
    -2 Wet coats clear, allow to cure for a couple days
    -Wet sand smooth with 600-800 grit, and shoot 2 more wet coats. This should be like a mirror.
    -If there is still too much texture for your liking? Repeat wet sanding w/ 600-800 and clear again. Watch building up too many layers thick on plastic parts.
    -ALLOW TO CURE FULLY. If you notice the sanding scratches are just not coming out like they should, your clear is probably still too soft. It may take 3-4 days depending on your clear and environmental conditions.
    -Denib with the above kit. Use the 1500 grit 1/2" sanding pads, Prep your fine blue waffle pad w/ the Purple compound by rubbing it into the foam, place a pea sized amount on the sanded spot, and polish out with the orbital polisher. If it's a black surface, you may have to use the light blue ultrafine polish to take out the swirls.

    I find these discs (Trizact) produce very fine scratches that are more easily buffed out than even 2000 regular 3m sandpaper. This kit just flat out WORKS. And it's FAST.

    Finally I do a final polish w/ a 3" polisher and same ultrafine pad using Wizards Shine Master polish/swirl mark remover. This is almost like a wax, and leaves the part silky smooth and looking great.

  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,254Member, Moderator El Moderator

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-3M-07653-Perfect-It-Denibbing-System-Kit-/191647995176?hash=item2c9f1c5528:g:9w8AAOSwrklVLHEl

    JUMP ON THIS DEAL

    This is cheaper than I paid over a year ago, and the exact same kit. Just price that nib sander and the oribital polisher alone, you'll see this is a deal

    That kit is $1500+ at local auto parts stores.
  • onehitwonderonehitwonder Posts: 2,740Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    Very nice!!!
  • isotretinoinisotretinoin Posts: 16Member
    Thanks guys K2 forums is really the best! I will take each and everyones advice and let you guys know about my polishing progress!
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 13,340Administrator El Jefe
    @ShowtimeGraphix Thank you for the time you took to write all that out...very much appreciated!...
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,404Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @ShowtimeGraphix that is great information. Thanks!

    But you have to remember that 99% of people looking at their clear aren't going to notice most of what we do. People buy cars w/ factory finishes every day and rarely even look at the finish on the clear. I LOVE a great clear coat job and I'm anal about it looking right when it leaves the door. But I know it's not up to the standards of what you just mentioned.

    My point? Do the job you're getting paid to do. For a $40 Yeti? Shoot clear on it, take out the nibs and get paid. It's hard as hell to do when you have an eye for defects but unless someone is paying you $100 for a custom Yeti dip, it's not worth it.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,400Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @ShowtimeGraphix We teach using an ISO/Water wipe after you remove a scuff. It removes any of the wax left behind to mask the haze. You would be shocked what that will reveal... but it's better than a angry biker standing in your shop after he washes his bike in the sun...
  • ShowtimeGraphixShowtimeGraphix Posts: 24Member
    @MidOhioHydrographics
    You are EXACTLY right!!! I have a VERY good eye. People pay me to look over vehicles to see if its been repainted, etc, etc. And you're also right: it drives me nuts and sometimes I need to remember that I have to hold up to the standards of the job. But then you get that one customer that is complaining about a swirl in the clear coat on a Yeti and its like "wtf....you want a perfect crystal clear job? it's gonna run a boat load more than $60-$80!" But it is what it is. Thankfully I can sand and buff a cup pretty quickly now.
  • ShowtimeGraphixShowtimeGraphix Posts: 24Member
    @WileECoyote Very good method! People like you are rare...most would throw a glaze over it and when the biker is standing there complaining, they'd tell them "oh its your wash technique" (which it very well could be...a vast majority of people don't realize how to clean a car....#bathtowels)
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,400Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @ShowtimeGraphix I like to think we try to do it right the first time. We also teach to fully scuff a part first, but then attack one scuff at a time. Its too easy to lose track of where the scuff used to be and not remove it completely. We use lint free towels alot, but honestly there are paper towels out there that are more like fabric than anything (definitely not available at Walmart, we get them from industrial suppliers) we fold them in 4ths and constantly flip and fold then throw away. We don't want to scratch a part because we were trying to save a buck on paper toweling.
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