Clear coat for Yeti's — K2Forums.com

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Clear coat for Yeti's

I am new to all of this and learning. I am starting out with small items like Yeti's and such and then moving up from there.

I've looked thru this entire forum "Clear Coat Information" and unless it 's somewhere else I do not see what clear coat folks are using on the Yeti cups. The coating has to be food grade safe and I did find one thread here that asked about food grade safe clear coats and it mentioned some salad bowl coating. However, after looking at it, it is used on wooden salad bowls and is not intended to be used on anything other than wood as it soaks into the wood.

So which food grade safe clear coat is being used on tumblers like the Yeti"s?

TIA,
Paul

Comments

  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 13,064Administrator El Jefe
    As far as I know? There is no "food safe" rating on any clear coats...so guys are just using regular 2K clear like on any other project. Once the clear kicks off? There is nothing left to do...it does not hold solvents or anything else in suspended animation...
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,199Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    ^^^ What he said. Also, if you're worried? You can Leave a 1/2" bare stainless rim around the top so lips don't come in contact with the coating.
  • ShowtimeGraphixShowtimeGraphix Posts: 24Member
    Whats the method y'all are using for spraying Yeti's?

    I am having hit or miss sessions clearing these. I get runs at the bottom and dry spots at the top.

    I am using Medallion 2k 4:1 clear at the moment. I am using a Styrofoam cylinder wrapped in tape to hold the cups upside down (also seals the inside) and spraying the bottom (well, the top, or big part of the cup) first by spinning the cylinder and spraying, then spraying the smaller part of the cup. I spray two medium wet coats to start and after about 10 minutes, spray another 2 medium wet coats. Once the cups are all finished, we flip them upside down, as all the slopes and angles on the cups promote runs going down the cup, so this has helped significantly eliminate runs. After about 30 minutes, I flip them all right side up.

    I am spraying through a DevilBiss (not sure the model....the same one TWN sells and recommends) using a 1.4 tip 3 turns out with fan wide open.

    Is there a clear out there that is less prone to runs? I see a lot of people using OHW's clear.
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 13,064Administrator El Jefe
    I feel a video coming on...
  • loochlooch Posts: 1,671Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    @K2Concepts has a video and says start with the needle out about 1 and a half turns. This is what i use for cups holding by hand and spinning plus my eyes ai t the best i can angle it towards the light
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,733Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    @looch what are those pvs jigs sitting in? The ones on the bottom row.
  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,185Member, Moderator El Moderator
    I use a mixing cup in them and stick my hand inside that. I spray a light coat along the rim of the cup at an upwards angle (holding the cup upside down) to make sure I get all the way to the edge of the lip. Then I just spray light but wet coats from top to bottom until I work my way all the way around the cup. Wait 15 minutes, repeat. Always hold the cup where you get plenty of light on it and you won't have dry spots. You can see if the clear "glassed out" or not. Just barely glass it out and you won't have any runs. I keep the cups upside down until dry.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,157Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @ShowtimeGraphix Its just technique man. You are spraying too heavy where it runs, and too light where it is dry. Its as simple as that. The differences in clear are not that great that they will compensate for poor technique. Turn your fluid flow down and when you get coverage WALK AWAY FROM IT. You need to let the clear do what it is designed to do (flow out). It's not going to look perfect right away, but come back 15 minutes later and it will look TOTALLY different.
  • loochlooch Posts: 1,671Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    @smedlin it pvc braces for closet rack home depot has them
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,733Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    looch said:

    @smedlin it pvc braces for closet rack home depot has them

    I KNEW I recognized them! That's a smart ideal!
  • ShowtimeGraphixShowtimeGraphix Posts: 24Member
    I appreciate the advice!! I don't want it to seem like I have no idea what I'm doing. Since November, we have sold over 1,000 tumblers. Out of those, probably 10-15% get a run that's so bad I have to sand and respray. Probably an add'l 10% get a small run that is salvageable. The most frustrating thing is not rinsing the PVA enough (something my partner has been doing lately as he is now the one "rolling and rinsing" the cups). That is killer. All those little dots are a pain in the **badword** to sand, clear, sand, and clear. Still quicker than re-doing it but something that shouldn't ever happen in this business.

    I do like the idea of turning the flow back. I recently started using a spot clear (15-20 minute dry time) and for that, I use a 1.3 tip instead of a 1.4. This allows me to put 3 coats, and as long as I spray the correct distance and with good movement, it ends up awesome!!!
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,157Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @ShowtimeGraphix Sorry, didn't know your level of experience. Play around with your tip size and go a bit smaller. Size the tip foir the parts you are doing. It may take a little longer to clear, but your defect rate will go from 10-15% down to 3%. Overall saving time and money. Pick a clear and run some viscosity tests to make it as consistent as possible over different cans. If you warm up the booth and the material (90° F) it causes the solvents to flash off faster and it will hole up a bit better. Right now you are using general techniques to clear... use "CUP clearing" techniques will yield better results... but you have to invent them first.
  • ShowtimeGraphixShowtimeGraphix Posts: 24Member

    @ShowtimeGraphix Sorry, didn't know your level of experience. Play around with your tip size and go a bit smaller. Size the tip foir the parts you are doing. It may take a little longer to clear, but your defect rate will go from 10-15% down to 3%. Overall saving time and money. Pick a clear and run some viscosity tests to make it as consistent as possible over different cans. If you warm up the booth and the material (90° F) it causes the solvents to flash off faster and it will hole up a bit better. Right now you are using general techniques to clear... use "CUP clearing" techniques will yield better results... but you have to invent them first.

    No worries!! I am far from experienced when my experience isn't the best! I need to get down to that 3%. My finger tips will thank me when the blisters and callouses wear off lol.

    I just shot a batch of 15 cups and tried a new technique. Backed off the flow a bit and spray a light dusting coat first, then a medium wet, followed by another medium wet 10-12 minutes later. Lets see how it works.
  • RadicalSideHydroRadicalSideHydro Posts: 588Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭
    We use large hardees to go cups they work better thany anything ive tried and we use them over and over. We dip the cups using them  rinse with them and clear with them so we never take the tumbler off the cup until its done. And we have a dozen or so small lazy Susan's to spin the cups on while we paint or clear them. Spray 2 wets coats and done i spray past the bottom and top of the cup to make sure i get good.  coverage.
  • RadicalSideHydroRadicalSideHydro Posts: 588Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭
    Forgot to metion we use shop line 630 clear with fast hardner on the cups. We use regular slow hardner on other parts so it will flow oit better before setting up. And we use deltron dcu 2021 on custom jobs. Here is a pic of the cup and lazy Suzanne we use.
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