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Interior plastics prep

SOUTHERNHYDROSOUTHERNHYDRO Posts: 261Member ✭✭✭
Will dawn be enough to take off years of Armarol or other time plastics shine?
I got some interior plastics to work on now.What are the tools/techniques for sanding in tight spots?

Flame,sand,OHW,dip,clear?

As always thank you for all the advice and help
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Comments

  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 8,932Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Depends what type of plastic it is, but generally you are correct. Dawn and hot water cut through quite a bit, but you could always do a solvent based degreaser first. If you want to sand tight spots? Blast it.
  • SOUTHERNHYDROSOUTHERNHYDRO Posts: 261Member ✭✭✭
    I have access to a small sandblaster,but I really want to buy a huge sandblaster in the future but often wonder if i would be better off building one.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 8,932Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    I have this one and I'm very happy with it. I modified the exhaust filter system and changed the gun to one that accepts carbide tips.

    http://grizzly.com/products/Industrial-Blast-Cabinet/G0714
  • SOUTHERNHYDROSOUTHERNHYDRO Posts: 261Member ✭✭✭
    I like that one. Looks like you get more for your money.
  • TsunamiTsunami Posts: 4,952Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    Craigslist. $500.00 all day long
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 5,857Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @SOUTHERNHYDRO Armarol will fisheye if it is not all removed. So you are going to have to be cautious. If you start to see fisheyes when you spray, stop. You will not flood them out or bury them, you need to regroup and clean some more.
  • 3monkeyshydrodip3monkeyshydrodip Posts: 811Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭
    For interior car parts we use acetone then hit it with a quick wipe of alcohol if needed. I never blast because some parts will break and you my remove to much of one part than another and after reinstalled two parts side by side won't line up. No need to heat treat (some guys heat treat their parts on every project like it's a needed step, well sorry to say people heat treated only needs to be done about 10% or less of plastic in the U.S.). Sorry for the rant, as far a sand blasters we got ours from Eastwood. 
  • SOUTHERNHYDROSOUTHERNHYDRO Posts: 261Member ✭✭✭

    For interior car parts we use acetone then hit it with a quick wipe of alcohol if needed. I never blast because some parts will break and you my remove to much of one part than another and after reinstalled two parts side by side won't line up. No need to heat treat (some guys heat treat their parts on every project like it's a needed step, well sorry to say people heat treated only needs to be done about 10% or less of plastic in the U.S.). Sorry for the rant, as far a sand blasters we got ours from Eastwood. 

    Do you sand or scuff with scotch pad too?

  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 12,761Administrator El Jefe

    For interior car parts we use acetone then hit it with a quick wipe of alcohol if needed. I never blast because some parts will break and you my remove to much of one part than another and after reinstalled two parts side by side won't line up. No need to heat treat (some guys heat treat their parts on every project like it's a needed step, well sorry to say people heat treated only needs to be done about 10% or less of plastic in the U.S.). Sorry for the rant, as far a sand blasters we got ours from Eastwood. 

    Hmmm...I would not take that as gospel...many interior car parts are ABS and will melt if you apply acetone to them...as for the heat treatment? I have seen more fail than not when decorators do not heat treat the parts...ANY PE product will need a heat treatment...and there is a boat load of PE out there these days...SxS's are becoming the most popular off road vehicle in the US and the 2 top manufactures are Can Am and Polaris...BOTH of those manufactures use PE in almost every plastic part...so the odds are? You are going to run into it and you are going to have to heat treat it...
  • 3monkeyshydrodip3monkeyshydrodip Posts: 811Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭
    Sorry @K2Concepts was up late and the paint fumes got to the brain alittle. I was speaking about car/truck parts on the heat treat. I understand that there are way to many types of plastics to name that may or not need heat treating. And by no means was I implying that heat treating is not a good tool for your toolbox. I just feel it's over used by some when not needed. As far as the acetone I misspoke and got that with alcohol backwards. I really need to lay off the midnight bananas. Lol again sorry if I was misleading that wasn't my intention.
  • 3monkeyshydrodip3monkeyshydrodip Posts: 811Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭
    @SOUTHERNHYDRO as for sanding it depends on the factory finish that your starting with. If it's cleared then yes we scuff with a pad or if it has "goose bumps" and the customer wants it smooth we prime and sand. But I just learned from @K2Concepts in another treat about using a clear and not a primer that I'll trying.
  • TsunamiTsunami Posts: 4,952Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    @K2Concepts I want to know where you are getting 5 sprayable quarts for $50.00?
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 12,761Administrator El Jefe
    Value Tech...I'm sure it's relabeled clear BUT it IS from the UK...which is weird...I buy it off my "FinishLine" truck...he even drops it off for me...
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 12,761Administrator El Jefe
    edited July 2015

    Sorry @K2Concepts was up late and the paint fumes got to the brain alittle. I was speaking about car/truck parts on the heat treat. I understand that there are way to many types of plastics to name that may or not need heat treating. And by no means was I implying that heat treating is not a good tool for your toolbox. I just feel it's over used by some when not needed. As far as the acetone I misspoke and got that with alcohol backwards. I really need to lay off the midnight bananas. Lol again sorry if I was misleading that wasn't my intention.

    Well...that makes more sense...ok here is where and why I tell people to FLAME treat...Firstly? If they are unsure...many parts are not marked PP or PE...so if they are unsure? FLAME treat them. Secondly? If they are growing and are starting to add employees. It's much easier to just make FLAME treatment a mandatory measure rather than depend on the employee to try to decide...if that is the case then you are just setting yourself up for failure...Lastly? Just to make sure...Way back when we started there was NO paint that could go direct to PP so we just had to FLAME treat...just the way it was...so if you can skip a step? Hey go for it...but if you are at all unsure? Then best to FLAME treat and be on the safe side...
    Post edited by K2Concepts on
  • TsunamiTsunami Posts: 4,952Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    I catch myself saying heat treating also. It's Flame treatment. Heat will not get the job done. LOL
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 12,761Administrator El Jefe
    ok corrected...
  • TsunamiTsunami Posts: 4,952Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭

    ok corrected...

    LOL

  • Freedom HydrographicsFreedom Hydrographics Posts: 245Member ✭✭✭
    In the automotive world, as @MidOhioHydrographics said, wash the parts thoroughly with dawn and rinse them very well to get all the soap off. Then clean with a wax and grease remover to get the rest off, making sure to wipe all of the wax and grease remover off, it will come back to haunt you. Scuff with a red automotive scotch brite, not too agressive, if you are just to manly and can't control yourself, use the grey. Just be careful not to get too aggressive or you will put sand scratches in the plastic, but a scuff pad will allow you to get in those hard to reach places. Wax and grease remover again to get the part free of contaminates including your greasy paw prints : )

    Now you are ready for adhesion promoter or a epoxy primer, whatever you have. AP  is cool if you are painting the part back to the original color. Epoxy is good if you are doing a color change, to help cover quicker, this is why I have white, black, and grey. You can tint your white with the color you are painting to speed things along. So the epoxy will give you adhesion and assist in a color change, EXAMPLE: The part is black but needs to be yellow, instead of putting 6 coats of yellow, you prime with white, and it takes a couple of coats. 

    So after you either AP or EP, you are ready to paint. Hope I wasn't confusing @SOUTHERNHYDRO . I haven't used OHW, but from what I have read on here, clean/degrease/scuff/ degrease/ paint with OHW  since it has AP in it. Hope I helped a little : )
  • TsunamiTsunami Posts: 4,952Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭

    In the automotive world, as @MidOhioHydrographics said, wash the parts thoroughly with dawn and rinse them very well to get all the soap off. Then clean with a wax and grease remover to get the rest off, making sure to wipe all of the wax and grease remover off, it will come back to haunt you. Scuff with a red automotive scotch brite, not too agressive, if you are just to manly and can't control yourself, use the grey. Just be careful not to get too aggressive or you will put sand scratches in the plastic, but a scuff pad will allow you to get in those hard to reach places. Wax and grease remover again to get the part free of contaminates including your greasy paw prints : )

    Now you are ready for adhesion promoter or a epoxy primer, whatever you have. AP  is cool if you are painting the part back to the original color. Epoxy is good if you are doing a color change, to help cover quicker, this is why I have white, black, and grey. You can tint your white with the color you are painting to speed things along. So the epoxy will give you adhesion and assist in a color change, EXAMPLE: The part is black but needs to be yellow, instead of putting 6 coats of yellow, you prime with white, and it takes a couple of coats. 

    So after you either AP or EP, you are ready to paint. Hope I wasn't confusing @SOUTHERNHYDRO . I haven't used OHW, but from what I have read on here, clean/degrease/scuff/ degrease/ paint with OHW  since it has AP in it. Hope I helped a little : )

    You dont flame treat? Tell me more.
  • 3monkeyshydrodip3monkeyshydrodip Posts: 811Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭
    Check out a website called stickynomore.Com it's a friends company. It shows what to expect from a lot of high end cars. 
  • Freedom HydrographicsFreedom Hydrographics Posts: 245Member ✭✭✭
    @Tsunami when talking about interior plastics, this is how we do it in the automotive world. For awhile now, in automotive, mold releases have moved over to water based. Soap and hot water is what you need to get it off. We were taught when I got my degree, to wash/dry/sand with sanding pad (and sanding paste option)/ degrease/ epoxy/paint. I've worked in mid and high end body shops and for myself, this is the standard. Never seen 1 come back in 10 years. As always, if someone out there has their own way that has been working for them, hey, keep it up. This is just the way I have been taught for the automotive industry : )
  • RDSHydroRDSHydro Posts: 1,672Member ✭✭✭✭
    @417hydrographics thanks for sharing your knowledge. Much appreciated.
  • TsunamiTsunami Posts: 4,952Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    Very valuable info there @417hydrographics . As always thanks again. B)
  • Freedom HydrographicsFreedom Hydrographics Posts: 245Member ✭✭✭
    Hey, for all the help I have received on here, I am just glad I have something  to reciprocate.
  • 3monkeyshydrodip3monkeyshydrodip Posts: 811Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭
    Thanks guys for your input. Like the old saying goes knowledge is power. 
  • SOUTHERNHYDROSOUTHERNHYDRO Posts: 261Member ✭✭✭
    Good stuff.Thank you.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 5,857Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
  • schidroschidro Posts: 343Member ✭✭✭
    Will the wax & grease remover cause fish eyes if not completely removed?
  • Freedom HydrographicsFreedom Hydrographics Posts: 245Member ✭✭✭
    edited July 2015
    It can cause a few issues including delamination. When using w&g remover, always have a dry rag/towel to wipe off immediately. When wiping wgr, wipe in 1 direction and wipe your dry rag in the same direction, so you don't just smear the contaminate around, you just wipe it off. It's always good to have a air blower handy to blow the piece off completely, this will ensure it was all removed.
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