Aqualac on glass

TroubleTrouble Posts: 332Member ✭✭✭
I haven't tried Aqualac on glass yet. How does it hold up and what's the procedure?

Comments

  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,259Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    We sandblasted the glass and painted it. Held up fine to the duct tape test.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,230Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Aqualac doesn't need an adhesion promoter to stick to anything except plastic, although using our AP on E-Coat makes it stick like CRAZY. The mechanical bond is good enough to get it on glass. and a sandblaster is great for that. We have scuffed glass with 500 grit and painted right too it. It works just fine.
  • TroubleTrouble Posts: 332Member ✭✭✭
    Thanks I will give it a try
  • Humble308Humble308 Posts: 165Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭
    @WileECoyote I'm interested in how the AP works for aqualac, is it sprayed on as a first coat? I've read alot of folks love that aqualac is a little cheaper to use, but I'm interested since I'll need to use an AP how it's more economical if I'm using more chemicals and more labor? Are there cases where Aqulac is going to be better to use than say OHW?
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,230Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @Humble308 the adhesion promoter that we sell is sort of like a "treatment" for the parts. It is only required for painting on plastics, but it is not really a coating. We have a cup gun that we keep filled in the booth (same as our activator) and spray a very light coat over the part and let it dry for a few minutes. (If we are doing a few parts, the first part is usually dry by the time we get the last one sprayed). The cost of what is sprayed on the part is pennies, as it is not really a coat, just a dusting. So the AP goes a very long way. We have been using the same pint for around 3 months now and are just over half gone. 

    As far as labor savings, it is essentially the same effort you put into blowing the part off before you paint. You don't ever actually have a need to exit the booth. So all in all. A little more effort, but negligible in the long run. 

    We by no means will disparage OHW, we like them, and get along great. We feel that Aqualac is an easier paint to learn to paint with (it sprays like we have grown up learning how to spray paint) it covers great, and you can get a little thick in areas and it will hold up and still dry out (We have even done demonstrations where we paint some simple objects blindfolded). That being said, it is not only a beginner level paint. I have worked in the high end paint business for over 20 years, and I still default to it. It's simple, safe, environmentally friendly, and easy. 

    All in all, the choice comes down to preference. You guys have 2 different types of very good paints that you can use, and they are proven, accepted, and have great support behind them. Simply asking a question on this forum, and you will get 20 people who have experience with them and can help instantly... That is a great tool to have, and takes all the fear out of trying it out.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,259Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator

    The cost of what is sprayed on the part is pennies, as it is not really a coat, just a dusting. So the AP goes a very long way. We have been using the same pint for around 3 months now and are just over half gone. 

    Well then... This is something else we may address during training! I think we are applying it too heavy.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,259Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @Humble308 For me it simply came down to cost savings. In the bulk quantities I'm ordering, I get a ton of savings over OHW. With OHW I was needing to dust on two coats, so to me it's the same as one coat AP, one coat Aqualac. And this may not be the same for everyone. It's just what works for us.

    BUT.... you have to do your due diligence when using Aqualac. Sometimes you need AP, sometimes you don't. Different metals will need different prep and primer. This is where OHW will shine. Regardless of the material, you degrease, scuff, paint. Done. That is very helpful in some shops, and a huge time saver.
  • Humble308Humble308 Posts: 165Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭
    @MidOhioHydrographics @WileECoyote Thanks fellas for shedding some light on it. I think I will try both to be honest. It certainly can't hurt to learn how to properly use two kinds of popular paint, and I imagine most dippers keep a couple kinds of paints around. WileE, do yall have a link for your AP, I looked on the site under paint supplies and accessories but didn't find anything? Thanks!
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,230Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @Humble308 I know we have it in the shop and for sale, but I don't take care of the computer stuff. I will be making one or two videos this weekend, so we may have it Monday. I will keep you updated.
  • TroubleTrouble Posts: 332Member ✭✭✭
    I am using both OHW and Aqualac. Both are good paints. OHW stick to everything but has to be done in light coats. I am still new to Aqualac but its becoming a favorite. I keep white, black and silver of both colors in stock all the time. I use Nason when I need a special color in a hurry or small amount and use the OHW as a primer under it.
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