Tips on blue flames

mark18883mark18883 Posts: 54Member
Hey all.

Dipping a bunch of parts and can't seem to get this pattern right.


 The colour seems to have washed out of the pattern. 
So I changed the water and cleaned the tank.

Then I tried again the colour was back to blue but developed round holes in the pattern. Not where air could get trapped either.

Firstly it seems to want to take a lot of activator as doesn't seem to glass out fully when looking at the film. But I'm slowing my passes down just don't want to overactivate it.

Water temp is 88° 
Soak around 1:20
Making 3 passes across 1.metre piece of film
1.4 tip set at 10psi

The weather has been in the high 20s low thirties lately so I'm thinking I maybe getting moisture through gun out of compressor. I have an air filter on gun but no water trap on compressor.

Would this be the reason why I'm getting random holes in pattern??

Thanks 

Comments

  • airtimegrafixairtimegrafix Posts: 2,144Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited July 7
    does the part have dimples on it? if it does that's prolly the reason your getting pin holes! as for washed out its prolly the same reason! time to learn how to airbrush!!
  • loochlooch Posts: 1,742Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    2 min soak is long time plus looks like hesitation lines
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,443Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Yep. You’re under activated still and have hesitation lines. Use a cool activator like K2 Brew or Mossy Sauce to help hold the blacks. Soak longer, more activator, maybe a bit of dwell after activating to let it soak in, and definitely be more smooth with your dip.

    Flame films are notoriously difficult because you’re dipping a dark, solid film over white. Any stretch and the blacks want to start to fade. Make sure your technique is on point. Don’t let it stretch.
  • mark18883mark18883 Posts: 54Member
    Yep. You’re under activated still and have hesitation lines. Use a cool activator like K2 Brew or Mossy Sauce to help hold the blacks. Soak longer, more activator, maybe a bit of dwell after activating to let it soak in, and definitely be more smooth with your dip. Flame films are notoriously difficult because you’re dipping a dark, solid film over white. Any stretch and the blacks want to start to fade. Make sure your technique is on point. Don’t let it stretch.
    I've ordered some k2 brew as using hydrovator plus at the moment. 
    I seem to be putting alot of activator on and always seems to be under. 
    Using a 1.4 tip. Around 10psi
    I've made 3-4 Passes and seems to have a lot down on film but guessing not. The film doesn't look glasses out fully when I'm dipping but hesitant to put more activator on thinking it will over activate. Guessing I've not got to worry about that then??
    Yes they are difficult these flames
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,443Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Unless you’re getting signs of over activation, lay more. Paint some speed shapes or other practice parts to test with.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,472Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Overactivation looks like oil and water. If you haven't seen that, than why are you worried about sneaking up on it. Just get more activator on the part.

    http://k2forums.com/discussion/10060/troubleshooting-your-first-few-dips#latest

    Look for the overactivation area in this thread.
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,899Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭

    Overactivation looks like oil and water. If you haven't seen that, than why are you worried about sneaking up on it. Just get more activator on the part.

    http://k2forums.com/discussion/10060/troubleshooting-your-first-few-dips#latest

    Look for the overactivation area in this thread.

    Can't over activating also fade (wash out) colors?
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,472Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    It obviously depends on the part and the paint below it, but typically it just melts the base. For 95% of the people that see overactivation (which is the problem only about 5% of the time) it is gonna just slide off.

    At early training classes, we ran tests and most of the paints that were made for hydrographics took at least 3-4 doses of activator before they showed signs of overactivation, and some up to 7 doses... These were done with @MidOhioHydrographics spray bar, so it was consistent. People gotta stop worrying about overactivation.
  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,276Member, Moderator El Moderator
    edited July 9
    I have tried to use that film and could never get a good hit with it. Dipping an axe handle half and half. Not exactly stretching the film. 90 degree water and 60 second soak time. Super Brew activator. Tried with and without dwell time after spraying activator. I even called Brent at Kansas where I got the film and followed his advice. Never had a similar problem with any other film.
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Posts: 1,673Member ✭✭✭✭
    I couldn't get a good hit with that film either. I prefer using the black and clear then add whatever base color I need 
  • TroubleTrouble Posts: 346Member ✭✭✭
    I never found a colored flame pattern that worked good or could take any stretch. I prefer base coating the color I want an use the black and clear flame also.
  • ForsiForsi Posts: 235Member ✭✭✭
    Agree with @DeviousDips and @Trouble ; you will likely have more success getting the black/clear pattern and controlling the color via the base coat. That is what we do and it is successful as compared to wrestling with the colored patterns.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,443Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Use the black and Clear flames, dip over silver, and coat with blue candy.
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 13,380Administrator El Jefe

    Yep. You’re under activated still and have hesitation lines. Use a cool activator like K2 Brew or Mossy Sauce to help hold the blacks. Soak longer, more activator, maybe a bit of dwell after activating to let it soak in, and definitely be more smooth with your dip.

    Flame films are notoriously difficult because you’re dipping a dark, solid film over white. Any stretch and the blacks want to start to fade. Make sure your technique is on point. Don’t let it stretch.

    This...

    Use the black and Clear flames, dip over silver, and coat with blue candy.

    And this...
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