Acid Etching — K2Forums.com

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Acid Etching

I need some advice for etching baked on enamel on porcelain. I'm thinking of using either Muriatic acid or Hydrochloric acid. I need to texture the surface so that the base coat has something to bite into. Sand blasting doesn't work, been there done that. What are your thoughts? Is there another compound that works better? Any advice would be helpful.

Comments

  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,081Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Tim said:

    I need some advice for etching baked on enamel on porcelain. I'm thinking of using either Muriatic acid or Hydrochloric acid. I need to texture the surface so that the base coat has something to bite into. Sand blasting doesn't work, been there done that. What are your thoughts? Is there another compound that works better? Any advice would be helpful.

    What were you sandblasting with? I've yet to find anything Aluminum Oxide wouldn't etch. Especially if the pressure turned up high enough.

    That being said, I have zero experience with Acid Etching, so I'll let someone else chime in on that.
  • TimTim Posts: 50Member ✭✭
    I was using Black Diamond with high pressure, didn't even phase it.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,019Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    I have used acid before, I don't like working with it and didn't like the results. Hard pass on a project that you can't blast.
  • TimTim Posts: 50Member ✭✭
    Don't want to pass this is not a one off but 3 whole pallets. If I make it work I will have my contract and get into production. I need helpful advice from anyone who's used acid. I want to know the issues, problems, etc. I'm not afraid to fail. Failure is the key to success.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,019Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    If you are not afraid to fail, then try both and test. You are going to have to do that anyway. I would NEVER go into production with only one option tested. If you do your process and it fails the adhesion test then what is your next option? get a few different products and try them out. Talk to people that do similar processes. If ONE material doesn't work to blast it, then I would find another.

    5 seconds of looking on google says that glass beads are the only way to etch ceramic...
  • TimTim Posts: 50Member ✭✭
    Yeah, I was planning to do all those tests anyway. It just always good to check with the forum first to see if anyone has been down the path that I am traveling, otherwise what's the point of having a forum. I've spoken with the manufacturer. The product is porcelain with a baked on enamel finish, I never said anything about ceramic, so much for the 5 seconds....
    Actually if it was that easy to find a solution I wouldn't be on this forum and I wouldn't be wasting my time nor yours....
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,019Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Sorry, that was more aggressive than I intended to sound.

    The point I was making is ceramic is about the hardest thing you are going to run into typically, so if glass beads etch that, likely it will etch a baked on enamel.
  • TimTim Posts: 50Member ✭✭
    Thank you, I'll give that a try. I have a 50lb bag of glass in the back, time to switch out the blast media and give it a shot. I'll finish this thread with the results of the blasting and acid etching if anyone ever needs to know the process of what works and what doesn't.
  • norcalfranknorcalfrank Posts: 967Member ✭✭✭
    I was in the ceramic tile industry for 31 years. Muratic will etch a gloss ceramic finish, but it may not be enough to get your base to stick correctly. On the enamel, I would try what Joe said. Give aluminum oxide a try. It's very agressive, much more than the garnet I usually use.
  • SreynoldsSreynolds Posts: 1,280Member ✭✭✭✭
    I will second the AO. Hopefully u wont have to resort to acid..
  • TimTim Posts: 50Member ✭✭
    Ok, I'll have to get some aluminum oxide and try it. Thanks for giving me the heads up on the Muriatic acid. I can certainly strike that from the list of things to try.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,081Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    I would definitely try aluminum oxide. It's more durable than coal slag from what I've read, but AO and glass beads is all I have used. Glass tends to almost "polish" hardened steel while AO will definitely etch. Not sure if that helps.

    If there are that many parts, testing is well worth your time.
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 12,946Administrator El Jefe
    @Tim Well..believe it or not? I am actually got a working prototype of an acid etch we are going to market with...sticks to glass even...I don't have labels yet but I am shooting videos this week hopefully...if you want to send me over a sample? I can do a hatch test for you and see if it works on those things...
  • Fejery4491Fejery4491 Posts: 131Member ✭✭✭

    I would definitely try aluminum oxide. It's more durable than coal slag from what I've read, but AO and glass beads is all I have used.

    Spot on. I do alot of blasting with coal slag when I'm doing larger parts outdoors with my pressure pot blaster. Coal slag breaks down pretty fast. I typically throw a tarp down and sweep up and reuse it a few times through. By the time you get to the 4th or 5th time through you can definitely tell it's time to pitch it and get some fresh stuff in there. I don't feel like coal slag would make a good media in a blast cabinet that's constantly circulating the same media.

  • norcalfranknorcalfrank Posts: 967Member ✭✭✭
    I've used coal slag (called Black Diamond here) for automotive suspension parts. It does break down fast and is dirty as hell. I wouldn't use it for the hydrographic process myself.
  • TimTim Posts: 50Member ✭✭
    @K2Concepts - I knew someone on here was working on a solution. Yeah, I'll take you up on your offer. This sample weighs around 25 pounds so I'll get a box and some bubble wrap and get one sent over to you. What is your shipping address?
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 12,946Administrator El Jefe
    I sent over a email asking for some more details on your project before we jump the gun...
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