Film over or under activated? — K2Forums.com

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Film over or under activated?

Hello

Are these films over or under activated? I dont understand, I tried several different ways and films. Customer needs wood and carbon so these are priorities.

Water temp 82 (28celsius). When I did course I was told even less is okay. Ignore the air bubbles, these were just film test rounds and frustration.

Kept film in water for 60-90 seconds before spraying activator. Sprayed it once, twice, outcome was still the same.

What am i doing wrong :( ??





Comments

  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,189Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2017
    biggest thing that jumps to me right away.. is not having the film dammed up correctly before you activate.

    That is why your film is distorting. Once you activate, the ink will return to a liquid state, and it will spread out until something blocks it.

    What's some speed shapes look like when you dip it?
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Posts: 1,147Member ✭✭✭✭
    You are still underactivated. You want the film to glass out. 
  • torumeestorumees Posts: 22Member
    But when i sprayed some more, it broke loose @DeviousDips

    i know what glassy film looks like but its just not happening at the moment, i dont know what is wrong
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Posts: 1,147Member ✭✭✭✭
    Like @smedlin said move your dams in closer. Let the film expand and when it settles move yours dams right next to the film so when u activate it can't go anywhere.  Which activator do you use or is it a home brew? 
  • PagesHydroDippingPagesHydroDipping Posts: 177Member ✭✭✭
    You need to warm that water up to 90. You can use colder water if you know how to read your film. Colder water makes for a longer soak. 90 degrees 60 sec is about average some film need a little longer for heavy ink. The film is not fully hydrated
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 8,706Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Pics of a dipped speed shapes would certainly help.
  • torumeestorumees Posts: 22Member
    edited October 2017
    I am using hydrovator, i will turn the heat higher, move the dams closer, and give it another go

    and 1 more question. Why do i have all these pieces of film floating about, even after pumping? Will that be an issue? 
    Post edited by torumees on
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Posts: 1,147Member ✭✭✭✭
    The little pcs won't hurt. Everyone has them.  They are just left over film that settle to the bottom of the tank and when u turn on the pumps it brings them to the top. 
  • studebakerstudebaker Posts: 2,722Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    Brian @liquidconcepts Posted a video about the problem you're experiencing with your activator application technique. This is a classic example of that. The film, in the video, looks EXACTLY like that, but I can't find a link to the video, so maybe they will post it for you. But essentially, you are spraying the activator too far away from the film. Bring your spray gun in closer. The drifting activator overspray that you feel like it is settling on the film and doing good, is actually just waste.
  • torumeestorumees Posts: 22Member
    So is this under activated? Looks **badword** 
    @DeviousDips @MidOhioHydrographics
  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,140Member, Moderator El Moderator
    Yep.

    1. Back tape your edges to keep the film from breaking off.
    2. Tape up the holes for the same reason.
    3. Wood grain films usually have heavy inks that require more activator than other films AND a longer dwell time to let the activator soak all the way through.
    4. Always practice on some speed shapes until you can dip it perfectly when you are using an untested film. That way you don't have to waste time repainting your customer's parts over and over trying to figure out how to get it right.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 8,706Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    edited October 2017
    These parts are super difficult.... how much dipping do you have under your belt? To be honest, if you're having this kind of activation issues then I don't think you should be taking on a project of this magnitude just yet. While it is very difficult, proper activation is the fundamental part of the process that needs to be perfected before you take on outside work. To just give it to you straight and honest, I think you're in over your head for your abilities. Before you waste any more time and money on materials, get some speed shapes and practice!!!
    Post edited by MidOhioHydrographics on
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,189Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭
    @MidOhioHydrographics has the truth of it.

    @torumees , we are NOT knocking you or putting you down.

    I've been doing this for half a year now, been to two different training sessions..and when I first started, I turned down a lot of work.

    And half a year later, I would still turn things down.

    I turn them down because I know I will spend a butt load of my own money doing it.

    (on the other hand, you will never grow if you don't push yourself.. but don't push to hard)

    I am getting better and better. But I had my growing pains.. which most of us have had.

    have you had any training in dipping yet?
  • SreynoldsSreynolds Posts: 1,184Member ✭✭✭✭
    Consider your gun set up !!! looks like its spitting activator
  • SingleAction52SingleAction52 Posts: 682Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭

    Brian @liquidconcepts Posted a video about the problem you're experiencing with your activator application technique. This is a classic example of that. The film, in the video, looks EXACTLY like that, but I can't find a link to the video, so maybe they will post it for you. But essentially, you are spraying the activator too far away from the film. Bring your spray gun in closer. The drifting activator overspray that you feel like it is settling on the film and doing good, is actually just waste.

    @torumees, This may be the link @studebaker mentioned:



  • studebakerstudebaker Posts: 2,722Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    @SingleAction52 Thank you for finding it for him! That's the one I was talking about.
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,189Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭
    I don't know.. when he sprayed that first film (around 3:40) I was like.. WOW, he's spraying really low and moving that film...
  • torumeestorumees Posts: 22Member
    @MidOhioHydrographics - thanks for the hard truth, these pieces are doing my head in, and I should start with easier pieces. I started with my playstation and did that really well, so i guess i thought pff, this is easy.

    @smedlin - i did do a 3 day training in the UK, dipped speed shapes, rims, mirrors etc, but never anything this complicated.

    I have sanded everything down again, I must try once more, because I cant give this **badword** back to customer.

    Thanks for the replies everyone.
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,189Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭
    torumees said:


    I have sanded everything down again, I must try once more, because I cant give this **badword** back to customer.

    My personal opinion.. you now have to try as many times as it takes. Even if you lose money on it.

    You started the job, you have modified (sanded, painted) the part. Gotta keep at it till it's done.

    I've had those parts myself. Parts I did over and over and over until I got it.

    Fortunately they was my own parts, but I spent a butt load on them cause of the multiple failures.

    Anyways, your business and name is "on the line" now.

  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 8,706Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    I agree with @smedlin but still paint up some practice pieces while you're painting the actual parts. Figure out the film and activator before you dip the large parts again.
Sign In or Register to comment.