Thought I'd give this a try — K2Forums.com

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Thought I'd give this a try

Hi all from the U of K. =)
I've ordered a couple of sheets of cheapo carbon fiber look film. First one arrived yesterday. Don't have cheapo activator yet though. Don't like the idea of £10 per can!
I wanted carbon look so I can see what's hap when I do my first few dips. The regular pattern should let me see where the film stretches or whatever. Probably.
Once I think I can get used to it, I'll dip more than just lemonade bottles! ;)

Comments

  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,147Member, Moderator El Moderator
    Welcome. I have very bad news for you. Hydrographics is the LAST hobby you will want to pick up if you are complaining about 10 pounds for ANYTHING involved with it. We are talking $10,000 USD for just a decent "hobby" level setup.

    Also, aerosol cans of activator are not conducive to consistent results due to their spray patterns and uneven atomization.

    Watch lots of videos of people online who know what they are doing (most online don't) and read this forum (search bar is your friend).
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Posts: 1,408Member ✭✭✭✭
    Welcome
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Posts: 1,408Member ✭✭✭✭
    Also all films ate not gonna stretch the same. Even the same pattern isn't gonna stretch the same unless you have the same exact techniques everytime. Any slight moment or speed and angle is gonna change how the film reacts on the part. 
  • NickelCityHydroNickelCityHydro Posts: 636Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭
    Welcome to the forum !
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 12,761Administrator El Jefe
    Welcome to the forum...
  • LibertymanLibertyman Posts: 766Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭
    Welcome
  • cheapocheapo Posts: 5Member
    NotSoFast said:

    Welcome. I have very bad news for you. Hydrographics is the LAST hobby you will want to pick up if you are complaining about 10 pounds for ANYTHING involved with it. We are talking $10,000 USD for just a decent "hobby" level setup.

    Also, aerosol cans of activator are not conducive to consistent results due to their spray patterns and uneven atomization.

    Watch lots of videos of people online who know what they are doing (most online don't) and read this forum (search bar is your friend).

    I hear you, but I wouldn't even spend that much on a car. let alone a hobby. ;) Though I am about to buy a compressor and spray gun kit. And I'm watching Jim's videos too. B)
    I've loved making stuff in my hobbies since the 60s and 4 years ago took up RC flying, making my own gliders from sheet foam and fishing rod sections. My next one will have a 3+ meter (8 or 9ft) wingspan!
  • cheapocheapo Posts: 5Member
    Thanx for the welcomes you guys. :)
  • cheapocheapo Posts: 5Member
    Sorry, but I have to have a bit of a wry smile here. ;) I don't actually get the $10,000 bit. It sounds more like starting a business. Shirley most people just wanna have fun with their hobby?
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Posts: 1,408Member ✭✭✭✭
    Unless you plan on dipping out of a plastic tote or have someone build you a tank for super cheap your gonna have at least a couple grand in just a tank. Im a fabricator for my day job and get material dirt cheap and for me to build a 4ft by 4ft by 30 inches deep was still right around 1500 after everything. But I also had my father do all the electric work so I saved lots there. 
     A compressor, at least 3 to 4 good spray guns, sandblaster, paints, films, activator. And that's just to name a few things, there is so much more. I honestly didn't think it would be as expensive either and I was dead wrong. 
     Of coarse you can do it really cheap but also turn out junk work. But if you plan to have quality and consistent parts you will rack up some money in Hydrographics 
  • Fejery4491Fejery4491 Posts: 115Member ✭✭✭
    cheapo said:

    Sorry, but I have to have a bit of a wry smile here. ;) I don't actually get the $10,000 bit. It sounds more like starting a business. Shirley most people just wanna have fun with their hobby?

    When I first came to this forum and heard "$10k+ for a hobby setup" I thought these guys were nuts. I was certain with me building a dip tank and rinse tank.....already owning some of the equipment (80gal compressor, a couple hvlp guns, etc) that I would come WELL under that number.....

    Fast forward a year....and we're into for close to $15k plus training expenses.....and we are finally turning out some really good parts.

    It's simply expensive to get into and there's no way around that. I forget who it is on here that said it best. You don't have a hobby, you have a business that's not making you any money.
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,438Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2017
    cheapo said:

    Sorry, but I have to have a bit of a wry smile here. ;) I don't actually get the $10,000 bit. It sounds more like starting a business. Shirley most people just wanna have fun with their hobby?

    The problem is there is no "middle ground" equipment.

    On one hand, is like what DeviousDip said.. dipping out of a tote and using rattle cans to paint.

    On the other hand is professional level equipment.. stuff people use that are doing this for a living.

    And.. there is really nothing in between.

    As @K2Concepts is always saying.. if the cheap stuff worked, we would all be using it.

    I spent WELL over 30k turning my garage into a hobby shop.. not do it for a living, but just as a hobby.

    Well over 30k.
  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,147Member, Moderator El Moderator
    edited October 2017
    Compressor, blast cabinet, paint booth, hoses, filters, dip tank, rinse station, sanders, buffer, activator, paints, paint guns, activator gun, film, and the list goes on. You cannot half-a$$ this with cheap tools and expect quality results. Imagine an auto body setup that also has a dip tank and you'll have a good idea of what this takes. And it doesn't matter if you are "only doing this as a hobby". The process and tools needed to do it correctly are exactly the same.

    There is absolutely NO WAY to turn out "consistently good" parts without investing in your tools and materials and doing it right. About a hundred have claimed they wanted or had to do it this way because they couldn't afford to buy the right stuff. None of them are still here proving me wrong. I am poor SOB and I work in a two-man graphics shop. My boss is cheap. Believe me when I say that if it could be done for a dime less than what we spend on it (and still get good results), we would be doing it. Hell, ALL OF US HERE would be. We aren't a bunch of millionaires throwing cash at this. We spend this amount because it's what is necessary to turn out quality work. A proper dip done in your garage will look just like what "professionals" turn out. You 'can' luck up every once in a while and get a good dip with rattle cans, but if you have to start over and re-dip most of the time, it would have been cheaper to do it right in the first place. Consistency is the key here.

    Go to your local auto body shop and ask the painter if he uses a Husky or Harbor Freight paint gun. Of course not. Because they don't perform well enough to do the job correctly. If they did, they would cost what an Iwata gun costs. The same thing goes for every other part of this equation.

    I am not trying to crap on your parade here. Just laying out the simple truth. If you (referring to anyone who reads this in the future, not just 'you' in particular) cannot afford to do it right, I wouldn't want you to get in over your head without at least informing the new guys about the truths that the Youtube videos never mention.

    We get guys that would rather experiment with making their own activator, not knowing if it will even work to save $10-15 over buying a gallon of proven stuff that will last them a year of dipping at the rate they will be using it.

    Just the air filter/water separator for a compressor is about $350. A little thing that most people wouldn't even know they needed until they wast a ton of materials because their gun is shooting specks of water and ruining every pass of activator and every clear job.

    Start a poll. We have members that come from all walks of life. From "Ebay kits and plastic totes" all the way up to shops that have many thousands of dollars worth of jobs in and out of their doors every day of the week. Ask how many turn out "consistently good results" and have spent less than even $7500 total. Maybe 9 out of 10 dips that end up good enough to be able to sell to the public...whether or not they actually end up for sale. Just talking about the quality of the workmanship here.

    It's the same reason no one starts classic car restoration as a hobby but can only afford a pair of pliers and a rusty screw driver.

    I get it. I really do. It looks cool and people get a nice sense of accomplishment when they end up with a nice piece at the end of the day. It draws a lot of people into this business. And it is a business. No one has a dipping hobby. They have a dipping business that doesn't make any money.
  • cheapocheapo Posts: 5Member
    No worries, my parade isn't crappable.
    I work in precision engineering, but I make stuff at home for fun. Bought a used compressor yesterday. Ordered a spray gun and 1L of activator online. I've use airbrushes in the past but not the full size gun. I'm not doing this for anyone else and almost all the equipment is useful whether I'm dipping or not.
    My hobbies are all mixed together in a big ol' menagerie. RC cars, RC planes, slot cars, die cast cars, windsurfing, kite making/flying, mountain biking. They all started small, went mad for a while, then sat patiently on the back burner while I messed around with the others. Dipping is guaranteed to run the same way.
    It's all fun! =) B)
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 8,932Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    I agree with you! I love building stuff. My dad and I are currently building a walk in cooler in his basement! You can build a lot of the equipment and do some things “cheap” but the real question is if it really saved you money. Sometimes the answer is a resounding yes, other times it’s an absolute no. Only you can decide and figure it out. I own a full time production-level shop. We had near $100k into equipment at the start. I put another $60k into it the first year and a half. I built and reengineered some things myself (Custom automation) other things we bought (conveyor rinser, paint booth, etc.). All this not including the actual physical shop. Now given we have automation and are running thousands of parts per week. But scale that back and $10k doesn’t sound at al unreasonable for a very basic setup.

    Just get started and have fun! Grab some OHW or LCHP aerosols, fill a tank with 90 degree water and get to dipping.
  • midnight_dippermidnight_dipper Posts: 47Member ✭✭
    It is all fun and we generally get out of something what we put in to it. You don't have to have the best of everything to enjoy doing something, hell, half the fun is trying different things to see what works and what doesn't. If you want to make your own activator, make it. Then when you get done you'll have a sense of pride and accomplishment that few people on this forum or life in general get to experience. If you work in precision engineering then you damn well know that sometimes it takes more than a few experiments to get something figured out so when it comes to dipping, you'll be fine.
    Good luck and keep us posted.
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,438Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭


    Just get started and have fun! Grab some OHW or LCHP aerosols, fill a tank with 90 degree water and get to dipping.


    This....

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