Sanding ABS plastic before hydro dipping?

Hi, few days ago I ordered my first film and activator, both not arrived yet, I am planning doing some little tests with it, because I am planning painting an ABS plastic enclosure speaker.

Is it really necessary painting a primer before dipping it? or is it enough by just sanding it with a medium grain sand paper? (making the plastic a little coarse/harsh) I feel like I can coarse a little the surface, then I hydro paint it, and then I apply a clear coat for durability. Thanks.

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Comments

  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,254Member, Moderator El Moderator
    What paint are you planning to use?
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,404Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    You can dip directly to ABS if it's the correct base color. But if you mess up, you'll have to paint it anyway. Get some compatible paint and practice the entire process before you move forward w the speaker enclosure. Despite what you've seen on YouTube, this is a difficult process and you need to practice (a lot) before you get it down.
  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,254Member, Moderator El Moderator

    You can dip directly to ABS if it's the correct base color. But if you mess up, you'll have to paint it anyway. Get some compatible paint and practice the entire process before you move forward w the speaker enclosure. Despite what you've seen on YouTube, this is a difficult process and you need to practice (a lot) before you get it down.

    Or pay someone who knows what they are doing instead of trying and failing repeatedly, spending as much money in the process as you would have at a shop, THEN paying them more to fix said mistakes.

    Despite what Youtube shows, it takes many months of constant practice and very specialized tools and materials to dip things well. It is not easy and it is not inexpensive.
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,880Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    NotSoFast said:




    Despite what Youtube shows, it takes many months of constant failures and very specialized tools and materials to dip things well. It is not easy and it is not inexpensive.

    There I fixed it for you @NotSoFast
  • johanx4johanx4 Posts: 23Member
    NotSoFast said:

    What paint are you planning to use?

    Do you mean what hydro film? One called green flames, which will match the black surface I am painting.

    You can dip directly to ABS if it's the correct base color. But if you mess up, you'll have to paint it anyway. Get some compatible paint and practice the entire process before you move forward w the speaker enclosure. Despite what you've seen on YouTube, this is a difficult process and you need to practice (a lot) before you get it down.

    I will practice a little painting an abs pipe I have some here. I have watched some youtube videos, it does not seem you need so skillful.
    NotSoFast said:

    You can dip directly to ABS if it's the correct base color. But if you mess up, you'll have to paint it anyway. Get some compatible paint and practice the entire process before you move forward w the speaker enclosure. Despite what you've seen on YouTube, this is a difficult process and you need to practice (a lot) before you get it down.

    Or pay someone who knows what they are doing instead of trying and failing repeatedly, spending as much money in the process as you would have at a shop, THEN paying them more to fix said mistakes.

    Despite what Youtube shows, it takes many months of constant practice and very specialized tools and materials to dip things well. It is not easy and it is not inexpensive.

    Of course I won't do that, and I can't believe you are recommending something like that instead encouraging me to do it by myself. I am an DIY enthusiastic that have done many things like wind turbines, big mdf subwoofers, spray painting arts, electronics, and much more. After watching some youtube videos of hydro dipping, I found that it really does not require big skills and one inexperience person can even do it correctly if having in mind some obvious basic things (I also saw some videos from users that were trying the technique for first time, I am surely I won't have any problem.
    smedlin said:

    NotSoFast said:




    Despite what Youtube shows, it takes many months of constant failures and very specialized tools and materials to dip things well. It is not easy and it is not inexpensive.

    There I fixed it for you @NotSoFast
    You looked like if you were talking about painting some art with airbrush, come on, hydrographics = Not big science at all.




  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,254Member, Moderator El Moderator
    @johanx4

    No, I meant just what I asked. What kind of paint are you planning to use. The kind of paint you use can have drastically different results on whether or not you need to prime the ABS before painting. Even what type of primer is needed, if at all.

    Youtube videos do not show 90% of what is needed to dip successfully. Why? Because what is needed is experience. Experience in knowing what paints to use, what films are hardest to learn to dip well (flames are among the hardest, so nice choice there, I guess), knowing what properly activated film looks like and about a dozen or so things that one would learn only through hundreds of dips (90% or so failures in that group).

    What kind of spray gun are you using for your activator? Let me guess....the guy on Youtube said you could use aerosol activator and it would turn out just fine, didn't he?

    With your unfounded bravado here, you are either a troll of the greatest magnitude pulling our collective legs or you are about to jump into the deepest deep end you could imagine. Do us a favor. At least set up your phone and record all of the steps you use on your dip so we can have a starting point in helping you correct your mistakes.

    I was just trying to save you hundreds of hours of wasted time and many thousands of dollars on proper equipment needed to do this consistently well. If you would rather ignore the advice given here, be my guest. Lots of people thought they would be the next Youtube dipping star. Don't hear from them anymore for some reason. Probably found out it's not as easy as it looks in the videos.

    If you never welded before, would you watch some videos and suddenly think you could do it well enough to pass industrial welding tests? Watch some videos of guys doing body work on cars and assume that would allow you to produce acceptable results on people's vehicles? Of course not.
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,880Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    NotSoFast said:



    If you never welded before, would you watch some videos and suddenly think you could do it well enough to pass industrial welding tests?

    Now THAT is an analogy people can understand. I like that one.

    And about sums it up
  • johanx4johanx4 Posts: 23Member
    edited August 2017
    NotSoFast said:

    @johanx4
    If you never welded before, would you watch some videos and suddenly think you could do it well enough to pass industrial welding tests? Watch some videos of guys doing body work on cars and assume that would allow you to produce acceptable results on people's vehicles? Of course not.

    That's your mistake, thinking in that way, after watching some tutorials on youtube, of course I am not going immediately to perform a test or exam, what I need to do instead, is to make some practice at home with a rented equipment or using a friends one, after evaluating and concluding the things, now you can decide if doing or not doing the industrial welding test xD.

    Talking about the thousands dollars, I am not going to paint an airplane, but just a 12" bluetooth speaker, only the front piece, when you take apart the unit, there are two pieces in total, I am just going to paint the front piece. So far I have spent about $20 and I ahve everything needed to hydro dipping, hope to do my tests soon and see how really it would me for me. I was trying to get advices here, but instead I got comments encouraging me not do it.
  • johanx4johanx4 Posts: 23Member
    I am worried about the items that I ordered from ebay, the shipping stats are frozen since days ago, hope to get them next monday or around the week, I am telling this because I also want to mention that a couple days ago, I watched a youtbe video where a guy was showing how horrible the cheap films are, they could get activated only after seven activator spry coats, and it was a mess when trying to dip something.

    The film that I purchased on ebay costed me around $10, do you think that would be high quality? I have seen cheaper items that cost around 3 dollar, they are just few, most of 1 meter samples cost around $9.99.

    I was some damned curious about how hard can this thing hold before it comes out, and what about if I coarse the surface, will the hydro film hold even much better after that? not even requiring any primer, well I know that certain films require different base color, which in certain cases you would be obliged to prime it or paint it, he he, annoying thing if you have found that if you make coarse the plastic surface, then the hydro film does not need any primer at all. As I mentioned, hope to get this soon. I was also thinking that if I get problem getting the water container, what if I do one made of wood, and then apply some epoxy or varnish coat in order to make it waterproof hehe.

    Try to motivate new users to do these magic things available almost to everyone. I am still not sure if this is a hydro forum forum, I just found it at google and I mean, I do not know if this is a forum exclusively dedicated to the hydro dip art or if it takes several topics, anyway hope to later post some pics if I ended trying this stuff in short.
  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,254Member, Moderator El Moderator
    You have made it abundantly clear that you have NO IDEA what is necessary to dip a part correctly. You say it has nothing to do with science, but it is all about chemistry, which I assure you, is a science. You are buying film from an untested Ebay seller for the incredibly cheap price of $10. You don't know if the part has to be primed before painting. You don't know what color paint goes under the film. You don't know that activator will eat through the varnish on a wooden dipping tank. You don't even know that this is, indeed, a hydrographics forum. You didn't know it was full of answers to your questions because you didn't bother to read the hundreds of posts dedicated to them.

    I am not trying to discourage you from trying to dip your part. I was being realistic in telling you what to expect. But in today's world, anything but blind enthusiasm for something is deemed to be discouragement. Whatever. You seem hell bent on doing it your way, no matter what we say, so go ahead and try your dip when your film arrives. Also be sure to do like the rest before you and blame the resulting failed dips on "cheap Ebay film" and not on the lack of experience on your part or not having correct tools. We have just been doing this professionally, lots of us for years, what do we know, right?

    Youtube videos lead people to believe that anyone can get good results in only a few minutes. What the videos don't show is them editing out the 100 failed dips for every good one using those cheap DIY kits they are selling. You only get to see the one they want you to see and 99% of the time, they don't show the whole part after it comes out of the water or what it looks like after the rinse when the film starts coming off. But good luck to you in this endeavor. I am sure it will turn out perfectly on the first try just like the videos show.

    Just remember to take videos of your techniques, take extensive notes on all of the stages of prep taken, type of activator and paint used, and take pictures of the dip afterwards so we can help diagnose what went wrong.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,404Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    edited August 2017
    Please know that we are legitimately trying to help you, @johanx4! Not trying discourage you from doing it, only give you realistic expectations. What you do with the advice is completely your decision. I'm not going to keep beating you down with negative comments, but we will be here if you have any further questions once you get your hands wet.

    As I stated, ABS plastic is fine to dip directly to (it has it's own difficulties, but it works). Remember that once the dip is bad, you will need to either sand it off or scuff and paint it with a compatible and properly colored base paint. (Flame films need a white base coat). If the ABS is not properly colored (Not white) then you must paint it from the start. Absolutely start with some practice parts, and post up some photos if they don't turn out correctly. It's difficult to diagnose problems without photos.

    Have fun! It's an amazing process and actually very fun once it comes out correctly. Almost like a magic trick, sometimes. Do it however YouTube shows, and we will be here to help with any problems you may have. Just remember, I employ 7 people with this process you're experimenting with and do it over 40 hours a week exclusively at my company. We literally dip thousands of parts every week and use many fully automated systems to help cut down on human mistakes. Please know that I'm not just "some guy" that dipped something once on YouTube and think I know what I'm talking about. Believe it or not after 5 years of doing this fullt ime? This process STILL gives us bad dips and problems every single week.

    Again, I sincerely wish you the best with your dipping! I hope it's incredibly fun and your speaker turns out perfect. If it doesn't? No problem! We will be here to give you advice on how to do it correctly the next time.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,400Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    johanx4 said:

    After watching some youtube videos of hydro dipping, I found that it really does not require big skills and one inexperience person can even do it correctly if having in mind some obvious basic things (I also saw some videos from users that were trying the technique for first time, I am surely I won't have any problem.
    You looked like if you were talking about painting some art with airbrush, come on, hydrographics = Not big science at all.

    I absolutely appreciate your enthusiasm, and love the fact that there are people this excited about this out there, but YouTube has lied to you my friend. @NotSoFast is not stepping on your dreams, he is telling you the truth. We will be here to help when the wheels fall off... and they will.
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,880Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    Blah,

    Y'all leave the poor bloke alone.

    Either he will succeed, or he will fail (and we will never hear from him again)
  • johanx4johanx4 Posts: 23Member
    NotSoFast said:

    You don't know if the part has to be primed before painting. You don't know what color paint goes under the film. You don't know that activator will eat through the varnish on a wooden dipping tank. You don't even know that this is, indeed, a hydrographics forum. You didn't know it was full of answers to your questions because you didn't bother to read the hundreds of posts dedicated to them.

    Of course I don't know, and that's the main reason I "initially" going to execute some practice test with smaller objects, so I can analyze how good or bad it holds on different circumstances, also that's reason I am posting here, to get advices.
    smedlin said:

    Blah,

    Y'all leave the poor bloke alone.

    Either he will succeed, or he will fail (and we will never hear from him again)

    Hey calm down "user", its a forum, not a sect.

    Hope to post here soon, this time with results, the shipping stats of my items are now running again, they should arrive soon. Thanks everybody, will take all your advices while running this.

  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 13,340Administrator El Jefe
    If you are going to paint to it? Then scuff it with 500 and let it rip...

    If you are going to dip directly to it? Then wipe it down with Isopropyl alcohol and dip it...

    And there ya go...
  • johanx4johanx4 Posts: 23Member

    If you are going to paint to it? Then scuff it with 500 and let it rip...

    If you are going to dip directly to it? Then wipe it down with Isopropyl alcohol and dip it...

    And there ya go...

    The speaker I want to dip is black, and the hydro film that I am going to use seems to need a black base, so at first instance I was thinking that it would not require a first paint coat if I observe that the film holds so well by itself on a prepared plastic surface, but then I realized that the plastic would turn gray color after the sanding, so maybe I will end adding a first paint coat before dipping it, so I get pure black color below the film, once I get the items will practice and conclude what to finally do. I don't know how strong a film can be, maybe it won't require sanding the plastic at all, and we are not talking about a very fine surface, but textured at some degree.

    I am taking this seriously, I have built some subwoofer boxes in the past using mdf material, I was thinking that it would be amazing hydro dipping the subwoofer cover that I usually put on them, in the past I only used flat color coming from those spray paints you get at walmart (so damned good: rustoleum/krylon, they are cheap but worth every penny), now with the magic of the hydro dip, my works would simply reach another level, well but that's coming later, at first instance I would like to paint the bluetooth speaker, which is already completely taken apart.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,400Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Sanding scratches fill in when you clear, and the color will look back again.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,404Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    edited August 2017
    I'm going to say this one more time And then I'm not posting anymore. You're on your own. Please. Listen. Again, black is not the correct base color for a flame film. Need it to be white. You have to paint it white. And you must use a compatible paint. Rustoleum and Krylon ARE NOT THE PAINTS TO USE.

    I'm still not convinced this isn't a trolling post.
  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,254Member, Moderator El Moderator

    I'm going to say this one more time And then I'm not posting anymore. You're on your own. Please. Listen. Again, black is not the correct base color for a flame film. Need it to be white. You have to paint it white. And you must use a compatible paint. Rustoleum and Krylon ARE NOT THE PAINTS TO USE.

    I'm still not convinced this isn't a trolling post.

    I agree with the trolling part. Claims it's all so simple, yet can't even paint the part correctly.
  • johanx4johanx4 Posts: 23Member

    Sanding scratches fill in when you clear, and the color will look back again.

    Yes I know, but I was not sure about the situation where we have a hydro film on a raw plastic surface and nothing more, I mean, how will it look in the clear sections of the model, still a faded color? and if so, will a clear coat fix it, considering there's a hydro film coat after that, after the very porous surface "the coarse abs plastic that we sanded", please be more specific, so I get this clear.

    I'm going to say this one more time And then I'm not posting anymore. You're on your own. Please. Listen. Again, black is not the correct base color for a flame film. Need it to be white. You have to paint it white. And you must use a compatible paint. Rustoleum and Krylon ARE NOT THE PAINTS TO USE.

    I'm still not convinced this isn't a trolling post.

    The film that I am going to use is that known model of the cannabis leaf, black background and green and bright leafs. So then should it be applied on a white surface? I really don't know, my future tests would discover it, since I was planning trying with both colors, black and white, give it a look and tell me, and I know that damn... that that film does not help about that ridiculous situation where you think that I am trolling you, but believe me, I am so serious about all this. I did not wanted to sound in the way that suggest that I am troll, you also have to consider that english is my second language, which is not as fast and natural as my first is, so it may add a rare energy to the message, who knows and who reality understand this complex reality we are just experiencing, I mean, at the most fundamental level hehe.

    Hope to leave some report once I played with this, :( you surely want a bad report because can't tolerate an inexpert user doing a very well first dip at the first try, which won't match your first experience and frustrate you hehe, just joking about that, but who knows, what if I get very well done that first objective I am aiming to? because I will practice with minor size objects, but the real challenge its gonna be to dip the speaker piece, which is big and complex at some grade. If I have it done in the first try, I won't really be surprised, it would be logic because I took my time studying in my head the process, I mean, taking my time, not like those users that are not very confident to it and do it anyway, and then obviously they get a bad result, thing that I don't want to happen and for that reason I am being analytic as much as possible to it.


  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,254Member, Moderator El Moderator
    Yes. The bright green in the print is only because it is over a white background. The same film over a black background would have very dark green colors.

    The possibility of being a troll comes from conflicting statements and innuendo on your part. You said science has nothing to do with dipping. When the fact is that paint adhesion and proper activation is ALL chemistry, which is a science. You claim it's not as difficult as we make it out to be, yet you don't even know what color to paint the part and don't know HOW to paint it, either. It seems that you would fall into one of two categories: someone who is intentionally trying to fool us into thinking you have no idea what you are doing (troll) OR someone who ACTUALLY has no idea what he's doing, but THINKS he does. At this point, I am not sure which is worse.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,400Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    johanx4 said:


    Yes I know, but I was not sure about the situation where we have a hydro film on a raw plastic surface and nothing more, I mean, how will it look in the clear sections of the model, still a faded color? and if so, will a clear coat fix it, considering there's a hydro film coat after that, after the very porous surface "the coarse abs plastic that we sanded", please be more specific, so I get this clear

    The areas where there is no image, there will be no film either. that is the component that washes away after the dip. The clear will fill in, it will be black. If you want to test, spray it with water, what color does it turn... clear is the same thing.
    johanx4 said:

    The film that I am going to use is that known model of the cannabis leaf, black background and green and bright leafs. So then should it be applied on a white surface? I really don't know, my future tests would discover it, since I was planning trying with both colors, black and white, give it a look and tell me

    Take a piece of colored paper and stick it under the print. If it looks better with white paper, then you have your answer... It needs to be painted white. If it looks fine with black, then try it out. But DO NOT use any aerosol paints from a store, THEY DO NOT WORK.
    johanx4 said:

    If I have it done in the first try, I won't really be surprised, it would be logic because I took my time studying in my head the process, I mean, taking my time, not like those users that are not very confident to it and do it anyway, and then obviously they get a bad result, thing that I don't want to happen and for that reason I am being analytic as much as possible to it.

    Trust me, MANY people have gotten this to work on their first try... and don't know how damn lucky they got. And some can't get it to work after 20 tries, even though they are following the steps they think they need too. Study all you want, this process is gonna kick your **badword** over and over. I spent 20 years in a production painting environment, and there still was a steep learning curve to this. Good luck to you, you are gonna need it.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,404Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    johanx4 said:



    The film that I am going to use is that known model of the cannabis leaf, black background and green and bright leafs. So then should it be applied on a white surface? I really don't know, my future tests would discover it, since I was planning trying with both colors, black and white, give it a look and tell me, and I know that damn... that that film does not help about that ridiculous situation where you think that I am trolling you, but believe me, I am so serious about all this. I did not wanted to sound in the way that suggest that I am troll, you also have to consider that english is my second language, which is not as fast and natural as my first is, so it may add a rare energy to the message, who knows and who reality understand this complex reality we are just experiencing, I mean, at the most fundamental level hehe.

    Hope to leave some report once I played with this, :( you surely want a bad report because can't tolerate an inexpert user doing a very well first dip at the first try, which won't match your first experience and frustrate you hehe, just joking about that, but who knows, what if I get very well done that first objective I am aiming to? because I will practice with minor size objects, but the real challenge its gonna be to dip the speaker piece, which is big and complex at some grade. If I have it done in the first try, I won't really be surprised, it would be logic because I took my time studying in my head the process, I mean, taking my time, not like those users that are not very confident to it and do it anyway, and then obviously they get a bad result, thing that I don't want to happen and for that reason I am being analytic as much as possible to it.


    Ok, yeah any film with bright colors (greens, reds, flames, sticker bomb, etc.) will want a white background. As stated above, put some different colored paper behind the print to get an idea of what it will look like. It won't be exact, but it'll be close.

    And actually, you have no idea how much I DO want you to succeed! I just also know the realities of this process. Either way, I know you'll get it eventually. You simply don't know what you don't know. There are so many variables to this process that we haven't even touched on.

    Now stop posting and go get your hands wet! And have fun! That's the ultimate goal!
  • smedlinsmedlin Posts: 1,880Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭



    Now stop posting and go get your hands wet! And have fun! That's the ultimate goal!

    And take lot's of pictures (or better, a video) of the process, so "IF" you have any problems/questions, we can help.

  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 13,340Administrator El Jefe
    johanx4 said:

    I only used flat color coming from those spray paints you get at walmart (so damned good: rustoleum/krylon, they are cheap but worth every penny)

    Not so much Batman...read below...had to say it so many times I just cut and paste it now...

    Rattle Can Explanation

    An aerosol uses special reducers and generally at a greater ratio than the paint used in a spray gun. (interpretation, it will be thin). Personally? I don't use Rustoleum so I have no experience with it. Not trying to be "smart" just saying it like it is. I did a bit of checking through and found what I suspected. First off, there are MANY versions of Rustoleum. But what I found is that they seem to be either an "Acrylic Latex" (think house paint) or "Oil Based Enamel's". Most likely you are using one of the "oil based enamels". Oil based enamels do not seem to take automotive paints above it, most often it seems to lift. The reducers in automotive paints are much harsher than what oil base can handle. And guess what? Activator is as close to paint reducer as you are going to get. THAT should tell you why rattle cans do not work right there...

    Rattle can paint is a 1k paint meaning no additives needed. As this paint does dry and get hard it is called reversible paint, meaning thinners, gas, carb cleaners, can loosen the paint and take it off like stripper does. They do now make rattle cans with a plunger in the bottom of the can, you push that up and it injects a hardener into the paint, making it a 2k paint. That may be more up your alley what you're looking for. Still you are much better off using One Hit Wonder, Direct To Plastic from Kansas Hydrographics, Low Country Hydropaint from Low Country Hydrographics or USA Paint from Dip Demon for your Hydroprinting needs.
    johanx4 said:


    The film that I am going to use is that known model of the cannabis leaf, black background and green and bright leafs.

    And now I know the problem...




    Thus the saying...


  • johanx4johanx4 Posts: 23Member
    edited August 2017
    Thanks everybody, I have read everything, so much to quote hehe. I have to say that so far I have done just one test, a little one but that told me too much, I dipped a little object (1"x1" mdf cube) that I painted with rustoleum spray few weeks ago, and found that the film has attached to it amazingly! the base color did not help too much because it was kinda dark green and I needed a bright base coat, tomorrow I am going to use an orange paint and paint a plastic, maybe the film attached so well because it was mdf, although painted with about 6 coats of rustoleum spray, let's see how it does behave on a painted plastic. Definitely this film is for white color, I just painted a sanded pvc pipe with orange color just because it was the most convenient color I had just next to my hand, I still want to check how compatible would it be with these type of spray paints (krylon/rustoleum) that's why I painted that pvc piece to check it as soon as possible and make solid conclusions, what I don't like about these paints, its that they stink so much, and they take their time to completely dry (24 hours or even more).
    Post edited by johanx4 on
  • johanx4johanx4 Posts: 23Member
    edited August 2017
    I just dipped the orange pvc pipe after considering that the base coat was hard enough, I decided to dip it. I see that the activator does not peel off or ruined the base coat, but definitely interacted with it at certain degree, weakening it, I leaved some marks with my nails easily, but a simple touch would not ruin the paint, that's why I said that at certain degree, not so weak, you can handle it with care, however i can say that the film is attached very well, I supposed that after few more hours all the set its going to get hard back again. Orange color also was a bad choice, it let the blacks show in detail, but the clear colors were not too bright, I don't know if that interaction with the base coat ruined the colors or it's just that everything will look good only on a white base coat. At this point I anyway will buy the recommended paint, I just was curious about those spray paints I mentioned and played with.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,404Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    One thing you have to remember... if $3/ can Krylon or Rustoleum worked? Why would we spend $12+ on the more expensive paint ourselves? I certainly don't like wasting money! Now you're out more wasted film and paint and time than you would be if you just used the correct stuff from the start.
  • johanx4johanx4 Posts: 23Member

    One thing you have to remember... if $3/ can Krylon or Rustoleum worked? Why would we spend $12+ on the more expensive paint ourselves? I certainly don't like wasting money! Now you're out more wasted film and paint and time than you would be if you just used the correct stuff from the start.

    I think that I have not wasted anything with that, since I am just learning, the hydro film sections that I have used were just little 1"x3" pieces, and the rustoleum paint, well I have few cans around here, that's why I decided to give a test to one of them.
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