And we wonder why color matching is so difficult.... — K2Forums.com

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And we wonder why color matching is so difficult....

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  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 12,564Administrator El Jefe
  • DeviousDipsDeviousDips Posts: 1,233Member ✭✭✭✭
    That is crazy. That's like mind control stuff
  • LibertymanLibertyman Posts: 744Member ✭✭✭
    That's crazy, Joe,,,
  • willie14228willie14228 Posts: 235Member ✭✭✭
    Doesn't work on my wife.... I always knew she was an alien 
  • Archer0545Archer0545 Posts: 804Member ✭✭✭
    Most of this is just examples of surround. It's how other colors and opposite colors have an affect on the way you perceive them. It's fun stuff. I colormatch for a living so I have seen this stuff for years. Interesting how the human eye really works.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 8,812Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    edited June 2017

    Most of this is just examples of surround. It's how other colors and opposite colors have an affect on the way you perceive them. It's fun stuff. I colormatch for a living so I have seen this stuff for years. Interesting how the human eye really works.

    Yeah I guess that's what I was meaning. The conditions and other colors surrounding a certain color can affect what your eye sees. When I was at Realtree they had a color matching room with special light, etc. dedicated to examining film and comparing it to other fabric swatches and prints of given patterns. The employees had to take a specialized test and score a certain level to even be allowed to do this task. There are only a handful out of 60+ employees qualified. Pretty crazy. For guys like myself trying to match in their shop? It's not easy. Then once you think you have it matched under your 5000k fluorescent lights, take it out to sunlight and it can change. Crazy stuff.
  • onehitwonderonehitwonder Posts: 2,635Member, Business Ninja ✭✭✭✭✭
    Then you add to the mix metallics - some flop dark, and some flop light.
  • willie14228willie14228 Posts: 235Member ✭✭✭

    Most of this is just examples of surround. It's how other colors and opposite colors have an affect on the way you perceive them. It's fun stuff. I colormatch for a living so I have seen this stuff for years. Interesting how the human eye really works.

    Yeah I guess that's what I was meaning. The conditions and other colors surrounding a certain color can affect what your eye sees. When I was at Realtree they had a color matching room with special light, etc. dedicated to examining film and comparing it to other fabric swatches and prints of given patterns. The employees had to take a specialized test and score a certain level to even be allowed to do this task. There are only a handful out of 60+ employees qualified. Pretty crazy. For guys like myself trying to match in their shop? It's not easy. Then once you think you have it matched under your 5000k fluorescent lights, take it out to sunlight and it can change. Crazy stuff.
    This was a lesson I learned a long time ago, never use fluorescent lights in a room that color was important, Art room, kitchen whatever. We are used to the warmer yellow temperature that a normal light bulb produces. Many Fluorescent bulbs have a cooler color temp in the blue-ish white range
    When I install lighting in a kitchen it is one of the first thing I almost always have to explain to a client, Fluorescent light is one of the worst lights to try and show food under
    Check out this link for more information on lighting....http://www.canon.com/technology/s_labo/light/002/02.html
    If you think about it this is actually a very important factor in what we do, a light source with an unbalanced color hue in it will cause some colors to be faded while others more pronounced.
    This could really screw you up if you are say trying to match a color sample in a book or show a sample in a room to a client.
    Even outside you can get different color temps depending on what the overcast is due to the filtering effect of the clouds
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 5,750Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    We had a "Sun Lamp" made by 3M. It was an expensive **badword** flashlight that simulated the sun for color matching, and a booth, where we could turn on 3 or 4 different types of light. Fluorescents are terrible to color match with, but perfect for finding defects (especially in clear), so do the color matching outside, and do the work under the T8's.

    Then you add to the mix metallics - some flop dark, and some flop light.

    And you would be surprised how much they can vary. Even depending on the painters technique. We could see the difference in color between painters when using the same pot of material!
  • willie14228willie14228 Posts: 235Member ✭✭✭
    @WileECoyote
     I seem to recall some magnetic painting process that aligned the flakes so they would reflect the same color at certain angles.
    I don't know something I saw on how it's made or some show like that??? I just kind of popped up in mind reading this. 
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 5,750Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Yep, we played with it a bit. Problem is, not all metallic is ferritic, and the painter can defeat alot of the effect simply by the angle they hold their gun (or how often they "touch up" that area). We got it to work, its simply putting a flexible magnet (cut to a shape) under the part and spraying over the top. Most flexible magnets aren't strong enough to make the image obvious, and the effect isn't very clearly defined. Remember these toys?

    That's sort of what everything looked like to me
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