? on heating tank.

DeviousDipsDeviousDips Posts: 1,651Member ✭✭✭✭
I was wondering you guys using the spa heaters are you also using heating elements and using the spa to just circulate heated water? Or are u completely heating tank with spa heater and eleminated elements

Comments

  • bmxprojectbmxproject Posts: 279Member ✭✭
    I plan to use seperated pump from heater. But very indecisive and unclear about what i need. Id prefer adequate heating time and energy efficiency. 
    Voltage, current, kilowatt, frequency. Over all, most efficient. But im just unsure of what it all means.
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,404Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    I only use a spa circulating pump. I use the element in the tank to actually heat it.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,403Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Voltage depends on what is available to you 220 or 110 are the most common. 110 is a standard outlet.

    Current is amperage/ Kilowatt is the amperage x voltage, so don't worry about that, it simply tells you how much power the device will consume. Higher the number, the better for you... as long as your circuit can handle the load. If you don't know what is available on your circuit? you need an electrician.

    Frequency is irrelevant for you unless it is foreign built. You need 60 hz, they use 50 hz in Europe.

    Most efficient is not a question. Power in = heat to your water. 220 will supply more power in a shorter amount of time because it can draw more. that is it.

    You can do a BTU calculation and find out how long your particular tank of water will take to heat based on actual gallons, then throw in loss through evaporation, and thermal transfer through the walls of the tank. Then knowing your process, and your turnaround time you should be able to calculate how soon you need to turn on your tank to be able to run at night...

    ...OR you can just get the 110V unit and figure it out when you get there after you insulate your tank...
  • norcalfranknorcalfrank Posts: 1,046Member ✭✭✭
    @WileECoyote If you have it, can you post the formula to do the BTU calculations for tank heat time? I would be interested in that. Thank you.
  • bmxprojectbmxproject Posts: 279Member ✭✭
    edited March 2017
    Voltage depends on what is available to you 220 or 110 are the most common. 110 is a standard outlet. Current is amperage/ Kilowatt is the amperage x voltage, so don't worry about that, it simply tells you how much power the device will consume. Higher the number, the better for you... as long as your circuit can handle the load. If you don't know what is available on your circuit? you need an electrician. Frequency is irrelevant for you unless it is foreign built. You need 60 hz, they use 50 hz in Europe. Most efficient is not a question. Power in = heat to your water. 220 will supply more power in a shorter amount of time because it can draw more. that is it. You can do a BTU calculation and find out how long your particular tank of water will take to heat based on actual gallons, then throw in loss through evaporation, and thermal transfer through the walls of the tank. Then knowing your process, and your turnaround time you should be able to calculate how soon you need to turn on your tank to be able to run at night... ...OR you can just get the 110V unit and figure it out when you get there after you insulate your tank...
    @WileECoyote are u saying there is no way to be both energy and time efficient? 
    Post edited by bmxproject on
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,403Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @bmxproject Energy in is equal to temperature of the water raised while also considering loss through the tank and evaporation. The more energy you pump in the faster the tank temp will rise. The higher voltage unit can deliver more amperage to the tank so it will raise faster, but that will cost you more money

    Money=Energy=Time. Raise one of those numbers, and the rest raise as well. Now You can reclaim some money by insulating the tank and not losing gained heat, but that is about it.
  • bmxprojectbmxproject Posts: 279Member ✭✭
    edited March 2017
    @bmxproject Energy in is equal to temperature of the water raised while also considering loss through the tank and evaporation. The more energy you pump in the faster the tank temp will rise. The higher voltage unit can deliver more amperage to the tank so it will raise faster, but that will cost you more money Money=Energy=Time. Raise one of those numbers, and the rest raise as well. Now You can reclaim some money by insulating the tank and not losing gained heat, but that is about it.
    Remember when Forest Gump was in boot camp and put his rifel back together too fast. 
    "Gump, you're a GD genius!"
    And much appreciated. 
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 13,340Administrator El Jefe

    @WileECoyote If you have it, can you post the formula to do the BTU calculations for tank heat time? I would be interested in that. Thank you.

    @norcalfrank Here is the Excel spreadsheet formula...
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,403Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    I was working on all the math behind this @K2Concepts was about half way done...
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 13,340Administrator El Jefe
    Bow to the master...
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,403Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    edited March 2017
  • norcalfranknorcalfrank Posts: 1,046Member ✭✭✭
    edited March 2017

    @WileECoyote If you have it, can you post the formula to do the BTU calculations for tank heat time? I would be interested in that. Thank you.

    @norcalfrank Here is the Excel spreadsheet formula...
    Thanks Jim! ( and @WileECoyote ) for the effort!

Sign In or Register to comment.