Heating Elements will not heat. HELP! — K2Forums.com

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Heating Elements will not heat. HELP!

EmmagrayEmmagray Posts: 5Member
I have just finished the build of my diy tank out of a deep freeze. I have 2 4500 w hot water heating elements wired with 10/20, each are connected to a separate 30 amp breaker and both are connected to a "lower" thermostat. I am getting power but the elements will not heat. They are brand new out of the box. Could this be a grounding issue? I have it grounded currently by running the ground wire to the side of the tank. For those of you who have installed heating elements, how did you do it successfully?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Comments

  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 8,934Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    What is 10/20?
  • Btimes3Btimes3 Posts: 102Member ✭✭
    I personally don't even use a thermostat just straight to the elements 
  • EmmagrayEmmagray Posts: 5Member

    What is 10/20?

    10/20 wire
  • EmmagrayEmmagray Posts: 5Member
    Btimes3 said:

    I personally don't even use a thermostat just straight to the elements 

    How do you control your water temp?
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 8,934Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    edited February 2017
    Sorry, never heard of 10/20 wire. I've heard of 10/2. (10AWG, 2 conductor w ground). 10awg is fine for 30A. And you're running 220v to the elements, correct? Not 110v?

    I apologize if this is common sense. I have no idea what your electrical knowledge is. If everything is "on" thermostat included, can you measure 220v or 208v across the leads at the element connections?
  • EmmagrayEmmagray Posts: 5Member

    Sorry, never heard of 10/20 wire. I've heard of 10/2. (10AWG, 2 conductor w ground). 10awg is fine for 30A. And you're running 220v to the elements, correct? Not 110v?

    I apologize if this is common sense. I have no idea what your electrical knowledge is. If everything is "on" thermostat included, can you measure 220v or 208v across the leads at the element connections?

    Oh it's not common sense for me, so I appreciate the help. Yes, it is 10/2...fat finger typo. I will measure and see. What if it is not?


  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 8,934Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Well I am now inclined to suggest you get assistance from a professional electrician. I apologize. Keep in mind you have now convinced me that you may be putting yourself in danger. If you're not comfortable wiring a 30A 220v circuit, don't do it. You're working with more than enough power to kill you and hooking it up to a huge tank of water that you will be placing your hands in.
  • EmmagrayEmmagray Posts: 5Member
    I think you may be right.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 5,857Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Stop poking around in there and get some help. This ain't worth dying over
  • NotSoFastNotSoFast Posts: 3,147Member, Moderator El Moderator
    I agree. Lots of people try to do it themselves to save some money, but getting an electrician to hook up your tank is about the least amount of money you will spend as a dipper. Don't skimp on the safety!
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 12,761Administrator El Jefe
    Oh this ought to be good...


  • IceMasterIceMaster Posts: 1,303Member ✭✭✭✭
    Agree with those above. Having done my own, I can tell you that the odds of TWO heating elements being bad out of the box are pretty slim. So that tells me there is an issue with the wiring itself and you are now playing with a ticking time bomb. When it comes to 220v there is no second chance, get it done correctly. An electrician is far cheaper than a funeral service!
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