Positive or negative pressure?

bdipshydrobdipshydro Posts: 49Member
  I'm trying to find information out about positive or negative pressure paint booths I tried looking and I know I've seen it in here somewhere. can somebody point me in the right direction or send me a link to these posts. I'm not looking to build my own I plan on purchasing one so I'm not sure if they're all the same or if there's a certain one That I should look at getting.  Also what is everybody else using as far as positive and negative paint booths ? Thanks in advance. 

Comments

  • Itchin2DipItchin2Dip Posts: 228Member ✭✭✭
    should be negative to my knowledge
  • K2ConceptsK2Concepts Posts: 13,264Administrator El Jefe

    should be negative to my knowledge

    This...
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,311Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Negative, running positive pushes your overspray out every crevice and lands on EVERY surface in your shop...
  • shredshred Posts: 108Member ✭✭✭
    I prefer positive pressure eliminates sucking in debris for shop if sanding is being done when running paint booth . Doesn't need to be much positive pressure. Also when you go in and out of door air is being pushed out instead of sucked in (unless you got a exhaust shutoff switch at door)
  • MidOhioHydrographicsMidOhioHydrographics Posts: 9,350Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Just need your door by your exhaust so when you enter/exit any dust isn't pulled over your parts. As long as the booth is sealed and filtered properly, you should be sucking unfiltered air from your shop. Only through the filters.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,311Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    Yeah, typically the oldest booths we had ran positive for those same reasons. So a crappy shop ended up looking even crappier. When I installed new booths, I sealed them well. Problem solved
  • bdipshydrobdipshydro Posts: 49Member
    Thank you all for you input. The door by the exhaust is a great idea. You guys are a life saver.. 
  • Militant83Militant83 Posts: 92Member ✭✭
    If someone is building a portable type booth that would be taken down after each use. meaning it probably doesn't have the tightest seals would you still go negative over positive? I've seen it done both ways with good results. If you go positive is the need for an explosion proof fan still as important since the fumes do not go directly through the fan?
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,311Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @Militant83 Positive pressure never has good results. It ALWAYS results in overspray covering everything in your entire shop. Every "portable" booth I have seen has been made out of plastic, and constantly flakes material off the walls that gets all over your parts, negating all the benefits of using a spray booth.

    Using a positive pressure spray booth does not require an explosion proof fan. But neither does using water based paints.
  • Militant83Militant83 Posts: 92Member ✭✭

    @Militant83 Positive pressure never has good results. It ALWAYS results in overspray covering everything in your entire shop. Every "portable" booth I have seen has been made out of plastic, and constantly flakes material off the walls that gets all over your parts, negating all the benefits of using a spray booth.

    Using a positive pressure spray booth does not require an explosion proof fan. But neither does using water based paints.

    I was going to do a little better than the typical pvc pipe and plastic, and frame in 4 walls that can be attached to each other to form the booth. Then use a material to sheet the inner walls about 3/4 the way up and then use a removable plastic sheet for the roof and last 1/4 of the sides for allowing light in. Being that I would only use it a few times a year I don't think it would build up all that much material to be flaking off and if it does it is cheap enough to just throw out and replace with a clean sheet. At least this is the theory that I have in my head.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,311Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    If you are only using a few times a year... Do you need a booth? Keep in mind, there is NEVER enough light in a booth. Using material that blocks light down below will require you to add lighting, which makes it less "portable"
  • Militant83Militant83 Posts: 92Member ✭✭
    edited August 14

    If you are only using a few times a year... Do you need a booth? Keep in mind, there is NEVER enough light in a booth. Using material that blocks light down below will require you to add lighting, which makes it less "portable"

    Could, I get away with not using a booth and just wet the floor down and do what I could to minimize dust and over spray sure I probably could. But as with all things I do I tend to go above and beyond my needs. The booth is more of a piece of mind that im painting in a more controlled environment to reduce contamination in my paint. The booth is initially being built to paint some motorcycle parts for my bike. Even with building a budget booth it is way cheaper than hiring a custom painter. By portable, im not wanting to take it places just able to tear it down and store it away in my garage when not in use.

    maybe use something like this to line the walls as a more permanent solution that would be easy to clean.

    https://www.menards.com/main/paint/paneling-planking/paneling/plas-tex-reg-4-x-8-white-plastic-interior-wall-panel/ptc0045m/p-1444450605703-c-8168.htm?tid=4980214879796713918&ipos=1
    Post edited by Militant83 on
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,311Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    @Militant83 I get what you mean by saying "portable" that's why I put it in quotes. You are free to build whatever you want, it is your hobby after all. I am just letting you know its probably a bit of overkill. You are going to be buffing this thing anyway, so whats the difference between 30 scuffs and 10? I painted motorcycle sets for almost 20 years, I saw VERY good results with table top booths with a foot of clearance around the part.

    The paneling that you are showing from Menards is what we used to make our booth at the shop. It reflected well, and cleaned easy.
  • Militant83Militant83 Posts: 92Member ✭✭

    @Militant83 I get what you mean by saying "portable" that's why I put it in quotes. You are free to build whatever you want, it is your hobby after all. I am just letting you know its probably a bit of overkill. You are going to be buffing this thing anyway, so whats the difference between 30 scuffs and 10? I painted motorcycle sets for almost 20 years, I saw VERY good results with table top booths with a foot of clearance around the part.

    The paneling that you are showing from Menards is what we used to make our booth at the shop. It reflected well, and cleaned easy.

    Yeah, I completely agree it is probably overkill for what I need it for. For as little as i'm spraying, If I wanted to I could probably just get one of those cheap screened in canopies to minimize bugs and debris and leave the garage door open when i'm spraying. But then im limited to only spraying in warm weather months. And your right with stuff like motorcycle parts it is getting color sanded and buffed in the end anyways. I had also considered making and open face booth. I figured if I made an enclosed booth though and wanted to spray in the winter time it would be easier to heat to a sprayable temp than heating the whole garage. A lot of times, I over think things and tend to go too far with stuff. That is why I like working through project on forums. You can learn a lot of what is needed and what isn't from guys with more experience. I know a guy that knocks out killer custom work with no booth on cars and bikes but his shop is a mess. I would hope a booth would contain minimize the amount of overspray that is spread throughout the shop. Dont want the new bike or my tools covered in over spray.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 6,311Member, Moderator, Business Ninja El Moderator
    We see alot of guys get excited about building a booth, or a tank or whatever. The build becomes the project rather than the hydrodipping. Once they get to the point where they have to start actually learning how to do it, and they see the money and effort that have to go in to the process... they kinda lose steam. So there they sit with a booth that they spent a few weeks and a thousand bucks on, trying to get rid of. Sometimes it is SIGNIFICANTLY cheaper to have someone do it for them, and just enjoy the results.
  • Militant83Militant83 Posts: 92Member ✭✭

    We see alot of guys get excited about building a booth, or a tank or whatever. The build becomes the project rather than the hydrodipping. Once they get to the point where they have to start actually learning how to do it, and they see the money and effort that have to go in to the process... they kinda lose steam. So there they sit with a booth that they spent a few weeks and a thousand bucks on, trying to get rid of. Sometimes it is SIGNIFICANTLY cheaper to have someone do it for them, and just enjoy the results.

    I get that, and i'm sure I've done similar stuff in the past with the various hobbies that I tend to get myself into. The bright side to the booth is if it only got used to paint the many motorcycle parts I originally wanted to use it for i'm still saving money over having a shop do it based on the pricing quotes i've received. Keeping in mind this isn't factoring in what my time is worth of course. So if I do use it for something else and get more use out of it even better. If not ive learned somethings along the way and still ended up on top. I like learning new things and doing things myself vs relying on others to do it for me. The main reason I decided to paint my parts myself.
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